Australia…we have blood on our hands

Australian filmmakers Augusta Miller and Michael Dahlstrom are backing a call on the Australian Government to ban the sale of ivory and rhino horn in Australia.

The pair joined forces with conservation group For the Love of Wildlife to create a social media commercial driving home a message that Australia has blood on its hands whilst allowing trade in ivory and rhino horn. It comes ahead of the outcome of the Parliamentary Inquiry into Australia’s ivory and rhino horn trade.

Miller said she felt compelled to do something to make a difference when she learned these items could still be sold in Australia.

“Like most Australians I had no idea that it’s still legal to sell ivory and rhino horn. When I found out I felt overwhelmed by a desire to do something about it.

“It’s despicable. It needs to stop. It’s the only ethical choice,” she said.

Dahlstrom agreed with the need to end the trade to ensure the survival of two of the world’s most iconic animals which are now facing extinction.

“It’s unfathomable that we’re allowing this trade to continue when one elephant is killed every 15 minutes for its ivory, and a rhino every eight hours for its horn.

“Unless our government takes action to end it, we’ve all got blood on our hands,” he said.

Miller’s mother, actress Sandy Gore, provided the voiceover for the commercial after hearing about the parliamentary inquiry into the trade.

“In the 1970s I was gifted two ivory bracelets. At the time I was in my early 20’s and had no concept of the degree of devastation these items had caused for elephants.

“I can’t change what happened to those elephants but I can do something now, however small, to give back and say enough is enough,” she said.

In March this year the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement launched the inquiry into Australia’s ivory and rhino horn trade. Evidence has been heard from the Department of Environment, non-government organisations, antiques and auction industry, Customs and online selling platforms including Facebook.

While the importing and exporting of ivory and rhino horn is regulated, it remains legal to buy and sell domestically.

For the Love of Wildlife has been working closely with Federal MP Jason Wood to end Australia’s ivory and rhino horn trade. The group has released shocking footage of antique dealers selling ivory they can’t determine the age of and advising customers how to illegally smuggle it out of the country.

Founding Director, Donalea Patman said damning evidence of the extent of wildlife trafficking in Australia had been presented through the inquiry and that there is overwhelming support to ban the ivory and rhino horn trade.

“It’s naively assumed any ivory and rhino horn in Australia must have entered the country legally, yet we’ve seen that the systems used to regulate international trade such as the CITES permit system and trade database have major shortfalls,” she said.

“Through the inquiry we’ve heard Australians are ordering ‘kill on demand’ for ivory and rhino horn from Tanzania and Kenya. We also heard of a case in Australia where a trafficker was caught with several rhino horns, ivory and cash, but was never prosecuted despite a water tight case.

“Traffickers already have a perception of wildlife crime being a low-risk, high-reward activity and Australia perpetuates this,” Patman said.

In response to those who believe Australia’s trade may be small compared to countries like China or Vietnam, Patman says the true volume of Australia’s trade is unknown.

“We’ve witnessed thousands of items for sale across just a handful of stores and online platforms, and in all of these cases, there wasn’t any documentation to prove an item’s age or legality. At best, sellers guess the age of items based on visual appearance.

“As long as our government allows for a legal domestic trade, we’ll continue providing opportunities for traffickers to launder illegal ivory and rhino horn into our legal domestic market,” she said.

“It makes us complicit in the poaching crisis and it’s a responsibility the Australian Government cannot ignore.

“We’re deeply touched and incredibly grateful to Augusta, Michael and their team for creating such a powerful ad with a message that we know will hit home for all Australians,” she said.

The ad can be seen at fortheloveofwildlife.org.au

In April this year the UK Government announced its ban on the domestic sale of ivory in a bid to help protect elephants. The move came after a public consultation process where more than 60,000 people showed their support to end the trade.

We need you to help stop the trade of elephant ivory and rhino horn in Australia.

Write to the Minister for the Environment, Hon Melissa Price MP TODAY.

Here’s a sample email you can copy and paste to the Minister at Melissa.Price.MP@aph.gov.au

Dear Minister

Every day that the domestic trade in elephant ivory or rhino horn continues, Australia legitimises the desire for these luxury wildlife ‘products’, stimulates demand and drives the current rhino and elephant killing spree.

Any legal market, including Australia’s, provides an opportunity to launder recently poached, illegal ivory and rhino horn and, as such, contributes to poaching and the illegal wildlife trade. 

I want Australia to take a stand and legislate for a complete domestic trade ban on elephant ivory and rhino horn, no matter the age.

Yours sincerely

 

How we have tried to stop this brutal trade in Australia.

For the Love of Wildlife has been working with its collaborative partners NatureNeedsMore and Gordon Consulting for the past two years, investigating Australia’s domestic trade in ivory and rhino horn.

Africa’s iconic elephants and rhinos are facing crisis with one elephant killed every 15 minutes for its tusks and one rhino every eight hours for its horn. At this rate experts are predicting they could be extinct in the next 10 years.

Australia’s trade in ivory and rhino horn provides opportunity for items from recently killed elephants and rhinos to be sold through our markets. The demand (in any country) is driving the brutal killing spree. Alarmingly, there are no checks and balances in Australia’s unregulated trade to prevent items from recently killed elephants and rhinos being sold in our own backyard.

From left to right: Rebecca Keeble (IFAW), Dr Lynn Johnson (NatureNeedsMore), Fiona Gordon (Gordon Consulting), Minister Josh Frydenberg and Donalea Patman (For the Love of Wildlife).

In September 2016 we met with Energy and Environment Minister, Josh Frydenberg with a communique calling for a full domestic trade ban. The response from the government was that the trade in Australia isn’t contributing to the poaching crisis and our laws, regulations and processes are sufficient to ensure this isn’t the case. The communique was signed and supported by 56 Australian and international organisations. This warranted immediate action.

It wasn’t enough.

Part of the Federal Government’s response was that the issue of domestic trade and enforcement rests with State governments, not Federal. So we wrote to the Environment Ministers for each state to ask them. As we expected, the responses stated that the domestic trade is indeed a Federal Government responsibility. This also warranted immediate action.

It wasn’t enough.

We then called on members of the Australian public to write letters and upload images to social media to demonstrate their support for stopping this brutal trade and do our part in stopping the poaching crisis.

All of the people we spoke to were genuinely shocked that it’s still legal to buy and sell ivory and rhino horn in Australia, and believe that it should be banned. Hundreds of letters were sent to Minister Frydenberg’s office and hundreds of photos were uploaded to social media. This demonstrated strong support from the public for a domestic trade ban.

This wasn’t enough.

In August 2017 a workshop was held with key stakeholders working with a Federal MP to share our findings and the evidence we’d collected. Following the workshop we provided the Department of Environment and Energy with draft legislation for a domestic trade ban. We’ve heard nothing back from the government on this draft.

It wasn’t enough.

We rallied the public on World Wildlife Day – Saturday 3 March 2018 – and hosted Australia’s first ivory and rhino horn crush event in Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne. The event was attended by Federal MP Jason Wood to show the world that the only value ivory and rhino horn has is on a living animal. Hundreds of people came to show their support with people surrendering items they had bought, been gifted or inherited from family members, for crushing.

Australia’s first public crush of ivory and rhino horn on World Wildlife Day, 3 March 2018. Demonstrating that the only value is on a living animal. (Jason Wood MP in hat crushing ivory).

Internationally applauded designer Collette Dinnigan AO was event Ambassador and the call for a domestic trade ban gained overwhelming support from high profile individuals including Aussie rock legend John Farnham, actress Asher Keddie, Dr Jane Goodall and former NZ Prime Minister, Helen Clark.

The Melbourne Crush received attention from a variety of media including 7 News, The Age, ABC, National Geographic and international agencies.

This STILL wasn’t enough.

On 28 March 2018, the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement initiated an inquiry into the trade in elephant ivory and rhino horn.

We must make sure this is enough.

This is the last window to make sure the Australian Government hears your loud and clear call for a full domestic trade ban on ivory and rhino horn.

If you feel passionately about this, and we know you do, then we ask that you write and include your voice in the submission process. Take action and be part of doing something real to stop the brutal slaughter of elephants and rhinos through a submission for this inquiry. It’s time this ugly trade is #Gone4Good.

We MUST have an overwhelming response so that there’s NO question that Australia enacts a FULL DOMESTIC TRADE BAN.

What will it take?

The Government has evidence to act. Whilst they go about “business as usual” we are watching elephants and rhinos disappear before our very eyes.

Write to Minister for the Environment Hon Melissa Price MP TODAY.

Here’s a sample email you can copy and paste to the Minister at Melissa.Price.MP@aph.gov.au

Dear Minister

Every day that the domestic trade in elephant ivory or rhino horn continues, Australia legitimises the desire for these luxury wildlife ‘products’, stimulates demand and drives the current rhino and elephant killing spree.

Any legal market, including Australia’s, provides an opportunity to launder recently poached, illegal ivory and rhino horn and, as such, contributes to poaching and the illegal wildlife trade.

I want Australia to take a stand and legislate for a complete domestic trade ban on elephant ivory and rhino horn, no matter the age.

Yours sincerely

South Africa’s fly in, fly out brutal hunting industry

A billboard designed to tackle “canned” lion hunting has been rejected by Airports Company South Africa Or Tambo International Airport, the gateway to South Africa.

The move came ahead of this week’s colloquium on South Africa’s predator breeding industry.

Aimed at deterring the brutal practice of canned hunting where tame, hand-reared lions are shot in confined area, the billboard shows a child holding a plastic toy gun with the message ‘skill level required to be a lion hunter’.

Donalea Patman, Founding Director, said the industry is all about a quick, cost effective and guaranteed kill.

“These so-called hunters buy the lion online before they arrive in South Africa and love to tell a story of how they supposedly shot a rogue beast that was threatening a local community.”

“What they actually shot was a tame animal that was likely to have been drugged and then baited to approach the vehicle, having being fed this way for much of its short life,” Patman said.

“It takes the skill of a child to shoot such an animal and that’s the message of our billboard which ACSA has rejected,” she said.

Recently Safari Club International and Dallas Safari Club, two of the biggest US hunting groups, stated they were distancing themselves from the canned hunting industry. The move comes amidst significant pressure from the Blood Lions campaign and global condemnation of the abhorrent industry.

The industry is also known for deceiving well-intentioned volunteers who pay thousands of dollars to hand-raise lion cubs, believing they will be released into the wild. Volunteers are often left distraught upon finding out their beloved cub has been bred purely for the bullet and they have been used as part of a shady supply chain.

“Hunters will shoot these lions with several bullets to the body and maybe then through the ear or eye to make sure the head remains a good trophy to stick on their wall,” Patman said.

“The intensive breeding of these lions is driving demand for lion products and impacting wild populations. We’ve been told of wild cubs being stolen to reinvigorate genetics of farmed lions and we know that the industry is also fuelling the lion bone trade.”

“Lions are one of the planet’s most iconic species and they are heading toward extinction. I think it’s absolutely appalling that staff at OR Tambo Airport have made an unfounded decision to block an ad that would play an important role in stopping their demise,” she said.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature currently lists lions as vulnerable (population decreasing) and indicates a 43 percent decline in lion populations between 1993 and 2014.

Staff at ACSA Or Tambo Airport said the decision to reject the billboard had no relevance to advertising codes of practice and was on the grounds of “not entertaining advertisements whereby children are associated with hunting and guns”.

Ms Patman said the response was unacceptable.

“The ad shows a child with a plastic toy gun and reality is children play with these toys. It’s not about a child engaging in violence or hunting.”

“They have asked us to redesign our ad but we’re not going to do that. It’s been designed to drive home the message that these so-called hunters aren’t hunters at all and they should feel embarrassed for shooting a tame, confined lion,” Ms Patman said.

The South African colloquium being held in Cape Town has heard evidence from economists who estimate that R$54 billion could be lost in tourism revenue if the barbaric industry continues.

“Many people we’ve spoken to will no longer travel to South Africa because of its consumptive and commodified approach to its precious wildlife, addicted to old paradigms including ‘if it pays it stays’, Ms Patman said.

“People are angry at poachers but we aren’t addressing the rich who pay to kill these animals for fun,” she said.

In 2015 Patman put the plight of Africa’s lions and the canned hunting industry on the Australian radar and worked with government to see Australia become the first country in the world to ban the import of lion trophies and body parts. The ban was implemented just months before Cecil the famous lion was killed.

Press in South Africa Traveller24 
And the results from Traveller24 poll.

FLOW submissions to the Parliamentary Inquiry

 

For the Love of Wildlife’s #NoDomesticTrade campaign, with collaborative partners Nature Needs More and Gordon Consulting, NZ has resulted in a Parliamentary Inquiry in Law Enforcement.

Working for more than two years in investigating the unregulated domestic trade, coming to a head in hosting Australia’s first and historic #MelbourneCrush where we destroyed ivory and rhino horn surrendered by the Government and the public to demonstrate that the only value horn and tusks have is on a living animal.

We know that Australian’s want his trade #Gone4Good with almost everyone we’ve interviewed or spoken to during this time is shocked and appalled that it isn’t already banned. Thank you to Jason Wood MP for his commitment to saving the magnificent and majestic elephants and rhinos.

Submission by Donalea Patman

Attachment to submission by Donalea Patman – Ivory Items

Submission by Hayley Vella

All submissions to the Parliamentary Inquiry can be found here:

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Joint/Law_Enforcement/Elephantivoryrhinohorn/Submissions

The Journey Home & Return To Earth

Melbourne Elephant Ivory and Rhino Horn Crush Epilogue

Donalea Patman, Founding Director, For the Love of Wildlife

 

For the Love of Wildlife has taken very seriously its commitment to the #MelbourneCrush and #NoDomesticTrade campaign. While the act of destroying elephant ivory and rhino horn items aims to show that the only value they have is on a living animal, importantly, we must consider that these items represent the death of thousands of elephants and rhinos.

#MelbourneCrush held in Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne on World Wildlife Day, 2018. Jason Wood MP destroying ivory surrendered by the Australian Government to be #Gone4Good.

Elephants are incredible creatures with strong social structures and personalities. Just like us, they have intricate family systems.  Rhinos are as ancient as time, yet there are just 27,000 rhinos left in the wild today. These sensitive beings are fast disappearing before our very eyes.

On Saturday 3 March 2018, Australia marked World Wildlife Day with a powerful message about the importance of these majestic animals, by destroying elephant ivory and rhino horn.

Understandably, we have being considering what the epilogue must be for the items being crushed.

A heart-felt invitation has been received from internationally celebrated artist and Founder of the Human Elephant Foundation, Andries Botha, for the crushed ivory and horn, of these elephants and rhinos, to take the journey home and be returned to the earth in the land that they were born. The crushed items will be buried beneath a bronze memorial Andries is creating to honour Dr Ian Player and his conservation partner, Magqubu Ntombela.

Dr Ian Player with his dear friend and conservation partner, Magqubu Ntombela.

Andries was a very dear and close friend of Dr Ian Player who passed in 2015. For the Love of Wildlife is both honoured and humbled by Andries’ invitation, for these elephants and rhinos to complete their journey home.

“It is, in my opinion vitally significant to bring the crushed rhino horn and elephant tusk home to the ancestral lands of these ancient creatures, where not only their bodies exist as essential components of our ecosystems, but where their ancestral presence and voices originate.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

I finish with a message from Andries.

We from the Human Elephant Foundation commend and support For the Love of Wildlife Ltd and the Australian supporters of the Melbourne Crush event.

It is critical that countries who are a part of the wildlife traffic economy take a courageous stand in support of wildlife that is now particularly vulnerable, as poachers, organised crime syndicates, corrupt governments and private and corporate business become more bold in their commodification of wild life products. It is imperative that we stand for these endangered animals. 

It is, in my opinion, vitally significant to bring the crushed rhino horn and elephant tusk home to the ancestral lands of these ancient creatures, where not only their bodies exist as essential components of our ecosystems, but where their ancestral presence and voices originate.

We are honoured to take custodianship of the crushed remains of these animals, to bury them beneath a monumental memorial sculpture soon to be erected to honour Magqubu Ntombela and Dr Ian Player, who saved the White Rhino from extinction in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and to repatriate them to the land they belong to.

A maquette of the memorial.

Andries Botha, South African Sculptor and Founder, Human Elephant Foundation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush, 1pm Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne 3 March

30% of Africa’s savanna elephants KILLED in 7 years. Rhinos left to DIE after having their faces cut off.

A perceived value in their tusks and horn for trinkets, carvings and status is driving this poaching crisis. Elephants and rhinos will be gone before we know it unless immediate GLOBAL ACTION is taken.

What can Australia and New Zealand do to protect these iconic species?

Enact a full domestic ban on the sale of ivory and rhino horn. Australia and New Zealand continue to allow an unregulated domestic trade, providing gaps for recently poached and trafficked items to be sold through our markets.

In September 2016 Donalea Patman OAM (For the Love of Wildlife), Dr Lynn Johnson (Natureneedsmore), Fiona Gordon (Gordon Consulting) and Rebecca Keeble (IFAW) met with Minister Josh Frydenberg to hand deliver IFAW’s “Under the Hammer” report exposing the rampant trade in Australia and NZ, and a communique signed by 56 Australian and International organisations calling for a full domestic trade ban – this alone should have warranted action.

Melbourne Crush ambassador, internationally acclaimed designer Collette Dinnigan AO, says; “As an Australian who was born in South Africa, I know that for Africa’s people to thrive its wildlife must also thrive.  Worldwide, any trade in elephant ivory or rhino horn that provides traffickers the opportunity to launder ivory and rhino horn from recently killed animals, must be decisively closed, this includes Australia and NZ. It is time to protect these magnificent animals, for our children.”

SURRENDER your ivory and rhino horn items to be DESTROYED to demonstrate that their only value is on a living animal. Drop items at reception, Melbourne Zoo beforehand if you can’t attend but wish to support this initiative, knowing too well that all ivory and rhino horn items are from the killing of a rhino or elephant, no matter its age.

Melbourne’s largest auction house Leonard Joel joins the call for a full domestic trade ban with latest Leonard Digital Newsletter promoting World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush.

If you wish to do something real for elephants and rhinos, please give generously – we can’t do this without you – Paypal or email info@fortheloveofwildlife.org.au

Stand up for elephants and rhinos by attending this historic Australian event. Send a loud and clear message that we want this trade #Gone4Good. For further event details click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working together towards the Melbourne Crush:

3 Degrees

Qantas

Save African Rhino Foundation

Born Free Foundation 

Zoos Victoria

Stephen Powell Photography/Wildlife Artist

Chris Gretch Design

Wisdom Graphics

Structured Events

 

We cannot stay silent whilst elephants and rhinos are brutally poached – their survival is in our hands.

An enormous thank you to internationally acclaimed designer Collette Dinnigan AO who knows just how important Africa’s wildlife is to its country, to its people. A true hero for wildlife, Colette’s commitment, hard work and passion has helped bring these extraordinary people together.

We cannot be silent and watch the brutal poaching crisis. Australia and New Zealand’s unregulated domestic trade allows for illegally trafficked items to be sold through our markets. Waiting for someone else to act isn’t a character trait of these extraordinary individuals.

All for the love of elephants and rhinos.

 

Workplace Giving

We have a very slim window to stop the irreversible decimation of wildlife, as we are in what scientists are calling the 6th Mass Extinction. Yet the ‘business as usual’ approach by large conservation and government agencies, we’ll lose some of the most iconic and beautiful wild ones; elephants, rhinos and lions, within the next ten years. We work from the top down, as it’s our endeavor to create global political will in doing more for the world’s wildlife. Our work with the Australian Government to be the first country to ban the importation of lion trophies and body parts, a courageous and visionary step by then Environment Minister Greg Hunt. A move that set precedent and was followed by other countries. We know our work isn’t sexy, but it’s creating a real difference for wildlife.

Donalea Patman OAM

 

Workplace Giving programs are an easy way for employees to make a big difference and contribute to something real for wildlife and wild places. It’s as simple as making small, regular donations directly from your pay, which can be managed by your payroll team, so you don’t even need to remember to do it. Donations are often matched by employers which means double the contribution.

Workplace Giving program is one of the most effective ways to boost morale in your workplace and demonstrate good corporate social responsibility. It helps build an organsation you can be proud to work for.

What’s more, these charitable donations are deducted before tax, so it provides an immediate tax benefit by reducing taxable income and there’s no need to keep receipts until tax time.

If you love wildlife then we encourage you to love our work as it’s all For the Love of Wildlife. We drive real change for the lives of endangered and threatened species.

We invite you to contact us for more information about Workplace Giving via info@fortheloveofwildlife.org.au or call (+61) 417 939 042.

By working together, we can turn the extinction crisis around and make the world a better place for wildlife.

How do I set up a Workplace Giving program at my work?

To set up a formal workplace giving program you should talk to the relevant person in your organisation (normally the head of human resources or sponsorship). This would involve the following steps:

  1. Identifying a group of staff members who are interested in wildlife and who wish to support For the Love of Wildlife.
  2. Each staff member who wishes to make a regular donation to us then needs to sign a letter authorising the payroll office to deduct a specified amount from each pay. We can provide a pro forma letter for this. The amount deducted will be sent by the payroll office directly to For the Love of Wildlife.
  3. We will liaise closely with your payroll office to assist in the establishment of the giving program.

Detailed information on workplace giving is also available on the Australian Taxation Office website.

Why workplace giving?

Regular donations are vital to fund our work protecting endangered wildlife and habitats, and meeting the urgent threats to our living planet. By donating through workplace (payroll) giving, you can make your money go even further.

Jason Wood MP tables Private Member’s Motion to close the Australian domestic trade in ivory and rhino horn.

Monday 23 October Jason Wood MP tabled a Private Member’s Motion to the House of Representatives in Canberra.

Jason championed the ban on lion trophies and body parts which was announced by then Environment Minister Greg Hunt in March 2015, before the death of Cecil, the famous lion killed by US dentist Walter Palmer.

The collaboration of For the Love of Wildlife with Fiona Gordon of Gordon Consulting NZ and Nature Needs More (previously Breaking the Brand) has exposed the serious flaws not only in the CITES reporting, but also Australia’s failure to prosecute with hundreds of confiscations and seizures over a period 2010 – 2016.

There’s a global call to close ALL markets and we’re very excited that Jason Wood is again stepping up for Africa’s iconic species.

Hansard from Monday’s Motion.

Australia…No Domestic Trade!

Despite what many Australians might believe, elephant ivory and rhino horn is sold in Australia.

International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) released their “Under the Hammer” report, exposing how much ivory and rhino horn is being sold through auction rooms.

The report identified that only 2.7 per cent of items inspected at Australian auction rooms had ‘provenance’ documentation which provides the most useful information to determine the origin and legality of an item.

Items for sale in Chapel Street, Melbourne.

At least three rhinos are brutally slaughtered daily and one elephant is killed every 15 minutes. The South African government released rhino poaching statistics for 2016, reporting 1,054 rhinos has been killed.

A privately funded Great Elephant Census states that African elephant populations have declined by 30 per cent over the last seven years.

The Chinese Government announced it will close its ivory market by the end of 2017 and it’s time Australia does too.

Print out the Speak Out Letter and post to the Minister. Details are on the letter and you don’t have to be living in Australia.

In September 2016 the Australian Government was asked to enact a total ban on the domestic trade of elephant ivory and rhino horn in a communiqué that was hand delivered to Minister for the Environment and Energy, Josh Frydenberg.

Signed by over 50 conservation organisations from around the world, the ban would be a move to ensure Australia commits to playing its role in saving elephants and rhinos from extinction in the wild in the near future.

The communique was presented by Australian NGO founders Donalea Patman (For the Love of Wildlife) and Dr Lynn Johnson (Breaking The Brand) together with Fiona Gordon of New Zealand based environmental firm Gordon Consulting and Rebecca Keeble of IFAW.

Ms Patman has been disappointed with the response from Minister Frydenberg and the apparent confusion about who is responsible for dealing with illegal ivory or rhino horn.

“The response was that Australia is unlikely to be driving the elephant poaching or international illegal trade,” Ms Patman said.

“On top of that, ivory was found for sale in Western Australia in December 2016 which didn’t have the required documentation (shocking to see that ivory appears in their catalogue again in February).

It was first reported to the Australian Federal Police who then referred it to State Police, who then passed it to Border Control,” she said.

“There is clearly confusion about who is responsible and a lack of political will to demonstrate leadership on this issue,” she said.

Items for auction in Mt Lawley in December 2016.

The threat of extinction of these iconic species remains high. In November last year Vietnam hosted the third International Wildlife Trade Conference in Hanoi.

The Duke of Cambridge and President of United for Wildlife, Prince William attended the conference and delivered a speech on tackling illegal wildlife trade. In his speech he stated “A betting man would still bet on extinction”.

Follow the campaign on Facebook and use the following hashtags #NoDomesticTrade #EyesOnIvory #RhinosMatter #NotOnMyWatch

Print out these posters, take a selfie with it and post to our Facebook page…show Australia that it’s time. The Australian Government needs the public to show that it cares deeply about saving these iconic African animals.

Print out the Speak Out Letter and post to the Minister. Details are on the letter and you don’t have to be living in Australia.

 

The communique that was hand delivered to the Minister in September 2016. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional press:

Financial Review, May 2018

SA Breaking News 13 Nov 2017

Lowvelder Press 13 November 2017

SA Breaking News

15 Minute News

Traveller 24

Netwerk 24

The Mercury