Time for a targeted ad campaign to up the anti against the horrendous canned hunting industry

Were you sick to your stomach when you heard US dentist Walter Palmer killed Cecil? This industry is far worse.

Every day in South Africa lions are bred for the bullet. Factory farmed for trophy hunters; these tame, hand reared lions are brutally slaughtered in small, high fenced areas. They are often baited and drugged, targets of the unskilled. These lions endure several bullets ending in a slow and painful death. Leaked footage exposes the horrors, including terrified lions being shot out of trees or whilst hiding in warthog holes. This is the canned hunting industry.

More than 8,000 lions waiting to die in horrific death camps.

Captive breeding and canned hunting is for those who want a quick, guaranteed, and cheap kill. A fly-in fly-out arrangement. Yep, lazy “hunters” that want an animal to come to them. Cubs bred for this industry are rented to tourist attractions, then lion walking activities, and finally returned to cramped and filthy conditions waiting to be bought online – and shot.

GET ON BOARD

Despite global outrage, the industry of breeding lions for ‘fun’ still thrives.  Unfortunately wild lions are also targeted by lion farmers. Prides are killed and cubs are stolen, all to reinvigorated the breeding stock for this industry.

With lions critically endangered, it’s time to stop killing for fun.

We are sick and tired of the hunting propoganda – hunters call themselves conservationists (remember we’re the bunny huggers) but what type of person kills a tame lion?

Captive bred lions unfortunately have no conservation value. Being genetically impaired, they have no future. This is yet another reason to stop the incessant breeding.

We need your help in funding this desperately needed campaign.

DONATE NOW – Pozible Crowd Funding

About For the Love of Wildlife

For the Love of Wildlife was the driver behind the Australian ban on the importation of lion trophies and body parts in 2015. A global first, this saw France and the Netherlands follow, with the US also implementing stricter import measures.

Join us in saving lions. We cannot bear to witness the continued exploitation of the King, a symbol of courage, strength and wisdom. Our lions deserve to be revered and protected, not cruelly and inhumanely exploited for profit.

It’s time to stop the brutal slaughter and close down this filthy industry for good.

What happens behind the fences.

WARNING: Graphic content.

Footage exposing the horrors of a canned hunt.

 

Become a member and help save our iconic species

To take the next step in our journey and be eligible for funding opportunities it’s imperative that For the Love of Wildlife applies for DGR Status (deductible gift recipient).

It does mean we’ll have more compliance and accounting responsibilities but we’re also looking into collaborating with international conservation groups in some exciting new projects.

Membership means you’ll be kept up-to-date on our progress and exciting news, with our continued and expected growth, membership offers!

$20 a year, it’s a bargain!!!

We’re always looking for passionate and dedicated volunteers and certainly appreciate ongoing financial support…no matter how small.

Please print out the form and email back to us… or email for further information.

A call for domestic ban of ivory and rhino horn in Australia

The Australian government will be asked to enact a total ban on the domestic trade of elephant ivory and rhino horn in a communiqué that will be hand delivered to Minister for the Environment and Energy Josh Frydenberg on Monday 26 September.

Signed by over 50 conservation organisations from around the world, the ban would be a move to ensure Australia commits to playing its role in saving elephants and rhinos from extinction in the wild in the near future.

The communique will be presented by Australian NGO founders Donalea Patman (For the Love of Wildlife) and Dr Lynn Johnson (Breaking The Brand) together with Fiona Gordon of New Zealand based environmental firm Gordon Consulting and Rebecca Keeble of International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

In 2014 Ms Patman took the plight of Africa’s lions and the canned hunting industry to her local MP Jason Wood. Just 18 months later the former Environment Minister Greg Hunt made the decision for Australia to be the first country to ban lion trophies and body parts from entering the country. The ban was implemented just months before Cecil the famous lion was killed.

Since then, France and the Netherlands have followed Australia by banning lion trophies. The United States has severely restricted import laws to curb the canned hunting and captive breeding industries.

Ms Patman said that despite Australia’s strict border controls, the sale of ivory and rhino horn has been seen in shopping strips, auction houses and online. IFAW has released it’s report“Under the Hammer” which exposes the rampant trade, showing just how much is traded in the oceania region.

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“This simply isn’t good enough given 30 per cent of elephants have been wiped out in the last seven years and rhinos are being butchered on a daily basis.

“Lions are being farmed for hunting and to satisfy a growing demand for their bones,” she said.

The communique coincides with the opening of 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES). Protection levels and whether or not to legalise trade of products from these animals will be on the agenda.

“Australia is geographically positioned and complicit in the illegal trade and it is time that we see a greater effort to combat trade,” Ms Patman said.

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“It would seem that Australian laws are not fully enforced. Auction houses self-regulate and without enough officers in the field, there is a staggering rise in wildlife items for sale.

“An ivory shipment was discovered at Perth airport last year and an investigation by South African Airways found the cargo was mislabelled. Despite communication from the government, we are uncertain as to the outcome and what happened to the ivory,” she said.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-04-09/customs-seize-ivory-in-air-cargo-at-perth/6381712

Ms Patman is also co-hosting this Saturday’s Global March for Elephants, Rhinos and Lions together with My Green World. The march calls for member nations of CITES to vote for the strongest protection levels for elephants, rhinos and lions, and to vote against legalising trade of products made from their body parts.

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“We are fast running out of time to save these animals from extinction,” Ms Patman said.

“With what we know to date, we will see these species gone within the next 10 years,” she said.

The letter to the Minister states: “We cannot bear to be witness to the continued annihilation of these animals. As we mark the start of CITES CoP17 in Johannesburg and the Global March for Elephant, Rhino and Lion, on 24 September 2016 in Australia and around the world, we stand as one, we stand for wildlife and ask the Australian Federal Government to enact a complete ban on the domestic trade of rhino horn and elephant ivory.”

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Contact:

Donalea Patman – Director, For the Love of Wildlife

fortheloveofwildife@gmail.com | +61417 939 042

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Blood Lions Australian Tour

Blood Lions proudly partnered with us for the first international screening, choosing Australia first due to the recent ban on lion trophies. Australia has set the standard by responding to the cruel and barbaric industry of captive breeding and canned hunting by banning all lion imports.

NEW DATES FOR MELBOURNE

Exclusive screening after Global March for Lions – Melbourne on April 2, 2016 at Cinema Nova, Lygon Street, Carlton at 2.30pm.

Tickets: https://bloodlions.eventbrite.com.au/

Blood Lions premiered at the Durban International Film Festival in July to a sell out crowd (500 seats) receiving a standing ovation.
Pippa Hankinson (Producer) and Ian Michler (lead role) have worked for years creating this film, facing not only financial pressure, but putting their lives (and the film crew) at risk. The entire Blood Lions team were very excited after a nervous lead up, knowing that the explosive film would blow the lid off the industry. More recently, the film has been screened via PBS and shown on Discovery Channel throughout the world.

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The film crew on stage after the premier of Blood Lions.

The premier was attended by Botswana’s Environment Minister and his wife, and many other special guests including members of the IFP.

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Botswana Environment Minister, Hon Tshekedi Khama II and his wife with Donalea Patman.

At the second screening CEO and President of PHASA (Professional Hunters Assoc of Sth Africa) were in the audience and even with Ian Michler’s invitation, they didn’t engage in the Q&A. Ian made it known that Donalea was in the audience and what For the Love of Wildlife had achieved in Australia.

Immediately following, PHASA connected with the Blood Lions crew for intense discussion. A public statement about the need to address the concerns raised in the film in regard to lion hunting went out the following day. Ian expressed how it had been years of wanting to engage PHASA and now the film was now playing it’s part in initiating change.

AUSTRALIAN TOUR

Fremantle

The first screening in Australia was held at Luna on SX in Fremantle held on the 1st September and was a rush start due to Ian Michler’s plane being delayed – but we made it in the end! Pippa Hankinson (Producer) had to cancel last minute as contractual and legal commitment to getting the PBS deal in the US was imperative and required further work. She was very upset and not being at the first international screening and sent her sincere apologies and we certainly missed her!

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Melissa Parke MP, Donalea Patman and Ian Michler before the Fremantle screening.

Melissa Parke MP attended and participated in the Q&A, showing particular interest in addressing the lion bone trade through Asia. Katrina Love, Animal Justice Party and many others engaged enthusiastically with a few from the audience realising they had inadvertently participated in the industry. The expression people have when they realise that what they’ve done – thinking they were contributing to conservation to find out that they were part of the cycle of canned hunting.

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Very grateful to Charlotte and Cecil from Luna on SX who were incredible in sharing the film via their networks and really helped on the night.

Sydney

Screening was at UTS and after some initial technical difficulties, we had a brilliant night…thank you Bryan Seymour for stepping in when it counted most!

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Bryan Seymour, Channel 7 with Donalea Patman and Ian Michler.

 

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Ace Bourke with fans!

Ace Bourke (Christian the Lion fame), Bryan Seymour (Channel 7), relatives of both Ian Michler and Pippa Hankinson, Jeroen Van Kernebeek (FOUR PAWS), Jan McGlashan (who assisted Pippa with transcripts), Paul De Villiers amongst representatives from Greenpeace, Sydney Zoo, RSPCA, to name a few.  Very interesting panel discussion with Matthew Collis (IFAW) and Hon. Mark Pearson, Animal Justice Party.

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Hon Mark Pearson (Animal Justice Party), Ian Michler and Matthew Collis (IFAW).

Great to have so much support with some flying in from all over the country. Thank you to all who donated including Alison Lee Ruby who made it despite being unwell.

Melbourne

Melbourne was a cold and blustery night but still a fabulous turnout. Engaging in panel discussion was Bruce Poon, Vic Convenor Animal Justice Party and Nichola Donovan BA, LLB, LLM Animal Rights Lawyer.

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Ian Michler, Bruce Poon (Animal Justice Party VIC) and Nicola Donovan, Animal Rights Lawyer during the panel discussion.

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The crowd before screening at Melbourne University.

Phil and Trix Wollen (Kindness Trust), Sean Wilmore (The Thin Green Line), Edward Bourke (Saving the Lion), Laurie Levy (Coalition Against Duck Shooting) and many other friends and colleagues. Very generous donations from Michelle Webb, the Australian Sweet Company, Stephen Powell and Peloton Design.

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Laurie Levy (Coalition Against Duck Shooting), Sean Wilmore (The Thin Green Line), Donalea Patman and Ian Michler at the Melbourne screening.

Thanks to University of Melbourne Animal Protection Society and Human Rights & Animal Ethics Research Unit for their very generous help.

Parliament House, Canberra

Screening at Parliament was the highlight for Ian Michler with invited guests and an opportunity to thank Minister Hunt in person.

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Senator Lee Rhiannon with Minister Greg Hunt in discussion with Ian Michler and Donalea Patman.

Unfortunately Jason Wood MP was away overseas on business, leaving Senator Lee Rhiannon and her staff to host us, but a real delight to know that this issue has brought the Greens, Liberals and Labor together. Attended by members of parliament, Environment Department staff, Heather Neil (CEO, RSPCA) and many from Canberra office of the RSPCA, Roderick Campbell (author Ecolarge) and colleagues from Australia Institute, Matthew Colliss (IFAW) and many invited guests and colleagues.

Greg Hunt gave a heartfelt speech in the committee room before the screening which left both Donalea and Ian a little lost for words! Senator Rhiannon was also very kind with her introduction.

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We had a fun time getting through security with Ian not having any ID and having to google him on a smartphone to show security who he was (who doesn’t travel with a drivers license!!!)

Before the screening a quick interview on ABC Radio with Ian discussing issues on air with hunters, who after he presented the facts, the hunters backed down and agreed with Ian.

Members of the Shooters & Fishers Party, Senator David Leyonhjelm and heads of hunting groups were invited as guests to attend screenings. Senator Leyonhjelm responded that we should see his talk on canned hunting that he presented to the Senate on 12 August – we told him we had and that’s why he was invited (failed to present any facts), his was response was that we were “silly”.  No other replies. 

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Melissa Parke MP after the Parliamentary screening with Economist Roderick Campbell, Ian Michler and Donalea Patman.

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A very special thanks to Claire and Nathan of Marini Ferlazzo who donated White Lioness artwork to be auctioned at each event and one which was gifted to Minister Hunt. To Kym Illman who offered generous discounts for his new photography book and donated a book for the Perth event. Donna and her mum from The Australian Sweet Co for donating black aniseed balls. To all of you who have assisted in anyway whether that be helping sell merchandise at screenings, spreading the word, posting on social media, handing out flyers, for keeping us sane!!! Deeply appreciate the love and support and together we will get this industry banned.

White Lioness

White Lioness by Nathan Ferlazzo

IFAW honours Australians for commitment to lion conservation in Africa

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Donalea Patman, Founder of For the Love of Wildlife with the award presented by Matthew Collis, IFAW and Jason Wood MP with his daughter Jasmine.

IFAW honors Australians for commitment to lion conservation in Africa 

by Simon Bloch, Durban

Two Australians have been honoured by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) for their commitment to lion conservation.

In a ceremony Down Under yesterday (Tuesday) Donalea Patman, founder of For the Love of Wildlife, an Australian NGO, and Jason Wood, Federal MP for La Trobe,  were lauded for their campaign to end South Africa’s legal practice of hunting captive-raised lions (known as canned hunting).

In February 2015, Australian Environment minister Greg Hunt enacted legislation prohibiting the import of lion trophies and their body parts to Australia.

This was four months before American dentist and cross-bow hunter Walter James Palmer sparked international outrage when he killed Zimbabwe’s wildlife icon, Cecil the Lion.

Actual Award 1

Presenting their IFAW Policy and Advocacy Animal Heroes awards, Mathew Collis, IFAW’s organisation’s Campaigns and Policy manager, said:

“Donalea worked tirelessly with her local MP, Jason Wood, to raise awareness about trophy hunters bringing the body parts of lions into Australia.

“With the help of internationally respected conservationist and film–maker Ian Michler (Blood Lions) Donalea and Jason were the driving force behind the federal government’s historic decision to ban the import of lion trophies.

“The ban reflects the Australian public’s abhorrence of canned hunting in which lions raised in captivity are hunted with no fair chance of escape. By banning the importation of lion trophies, Australia is no longer complicit in the cruelty of canned hunting” he added.

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Patman said she was humbled to have been recognised by IFAW.

“I don’t do my work for awards, I do it because I believe Africa’s wildlife is under siege. I’m incredibly honoured” she said.

“Miss Patman has undertaken remarkable work to protect endangered wildlife, and I applaud her commitment” Jason Wood said.

France follows Australia in banning lion trophies

Despite the horror that France has faced in the past week, today Segolene Royal, Minister of Environment in France announced the immediate ban on import permits of lion trophies and body parts. Following Australia’s visionary and courageous lead, announced by Environment Minister, Greg Hunt in March 2015 (months before the killing of Cecil) France is the second country to step up.

EU Meetings

From the left: Dr Ilaria di Silvestre, Dr Pieter Kat (LionAid), Ian Michler (lead role Blood Lions and investigative journalist) and Gael de-Rotalier

Ian Michler with colleagues including Pieter Kat, LionAid briefed and held discussions with members of the EU and screened the explosive movie Blood Lions.

Minister Hunt pledged to take it up with the EU at the screening held in Parliament House, Canberra in September. He also met with members of LionAid in the UK weeks prior to this announcement. Pieter Kat and Christine Macsween along with LionAid patron John Rendall briefed the Minister about the critical urgency facing Africa’s lions, over and above captive breeding and canned hunting.

Greg Hunt LionAid

From the left: Dr Pieter Kat, The Hon. Greg Hunt, Chris Macsween and John Rendall

The following is from LionAid’s website dated 18 November, 2015:

Through the Brigitte Bardot Foundation, we yesterday heard that Segolene Royal, Minister of Environment in France issued a letter stating that “I have instructed my services to no longer issue import permits for lion hunting trophies”.
This is excellent news, as France ranks high among the EU Member States for the import of such trophies.
Minister Royal also mentioned that she would consult with other EU Member State Environment Ministers to impose stricter rules on the import of all hunting trophies.
We applaud Minister Royal for this timely decision, and hope that this will precipitate like-minded decisions from many other EU Member States. 

More positive news on the very same day, PHASA (Professional Hunters Association of Sth Africa) AGM has fantastic results.

At the PHASA Convention held at Protea Hotel Ranch Resort: Canned lion breeders outvoted 147 to 103, after a very emotional and draining AGM.

Motion passed that PHASA disassociates with the captive-bred lion industry until such time that they can convince PHASA and the IUCN that the practice is beneficial to lion conservation (this won’t ever happen, so it looks like it’s the end for them!).

Thanks to Ian Michler (lead role) and Phillipa Hankinson (producer) for the Blood Lions documentary, which made such a big difference, along with progressive PHs such as Stewart Dorrington and SAMPEO.co.za, who did the right thing.

The CEO and President of PHASA attended the second night’s screening of Blood Lions in Durban when it was premiered at the Durban International Film Festival in July 2015.

 

 

Object

The Objects:

  • establishing and maintaining the Public Fund for receiving gifts and donations to pursue the Company’s Objects;
  • the protection and enhancement of the natural environment, which include habitat reclamation and restoration;
  • ensuring that all fauna remains as diverse as possible and reducing the risk of extinctions as aligned with the principles of biodiversity conservation;
  • raising and effectively directing funds towards exposing wildlife trafficking and wildlife crimes throughout the world;
  • promoting, motivating and educating the community to take action to prevent wildlife trafficking and wildlife crimes;
  • promoting, motivating and educating the community about ethical travel as it relates to the destruction of the natural environment;
  • participating with others, globally, for solutions-based concepts protecting wildlife;
  • participating with others, globally, for solutions-based concepts in exposing wildlife trafficking and wildlife crimes;
  • doing all other things as may be incidental and ancillary to the attainment of these Objects including leadership training and courses promoting ‘ecological intelligence’; and
  • exercising any powers that the Company has by having the legal capacity of a natural person, including by performing any act or function which it is authorised or required to do by any law.

Greg Brown’s love of wildlife

Greg Brown, one of Australia’s finest chefs has created great tasting granitas with real fruits. Simply add water and freeze!

He has been an international success story, with his restaurants being world class, ambassador for luxury items and his talents have been in demand worldwide.

Being a gourmet chef has always had its challenges. But being a gourmet chef diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the reason behind this launch.

When Greg was first (mis) diagnosed many of his friends and colleagues thought he had hit the bottle and was a drunk…almost 10 years ago now.

MS does that, it affects the muscles and speech and so you physically wobble and slur. He’s had to fight to stay not only on top of his disease, but to retain his dignity and talent. Due to MS he’s had his businesses taken away from him, he was made a ward of the state (6 years to regain his independence), lost his antique and other rare collections, his family, his friends and hasn’t been able to work for many years. He was in Canberra, Australia when he had a fall, the police picked him up and put him in a cell for two days without his medication all because they didn’t believe he had MS and made the mistake (almost a fatal one) of not listening to him.

With MS it’s best you eat cold food so that your throat muscles stay tight making it easier to speak, eat and breathe. Greg quickly became bored with sucking on ice blocks and with his palette still finely attuned, he decided to embark on developing food for people not only with MS, but with disabilities in general.

Greg has wanted the emphasis to be on flavour using mostly all natural ingredients, that are simple and easy to make (making you the food hero). This range of granita mixes are made from 100% natural fruit. Simply add the granita mix to 600 ml of boiling water and freeze. Once frozen remove and let sit for a short while, stir through with a fork, ready to serve. The portion you don’t use just return to the freezer as granita last for months. It’s that easy!

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How has protecting wildlife become part of the project?

Greg Brown has always been connected to nature, having been raised on a farm, he is a man of the land. He remembers killing a small animal when he was a kid and that action has haunted him till today.

Greg resides in the beautiful forest of Sherbrooke, Mt Dandenong where he is surrounded by birds, wallabies, wombats and all sorts of wonderful creatures.

Sherbrooke Forest
Sherbrooke Forest

Early 2015 he met a woman at a local cafe and became interested in the work she was doing. Donalea Patman is the founder of For the Love of Wildlife which has been created to expose crimes against nature. The first campaign targeting the cruel and barbaric industry of captive breeding and canned hunting of African lions.

After watching the remarkable capacity of this small organisation to accomplish so much in the short period of time he’d known Donalea, Greg realised that Africa’s wildlife is under siege and wanted to be able to contribute in some way.

For the Love of Wildlife has been the catalyst in the Australian Federal Government banning the importation of lion trophies and body parts as a direct response to this barbaric industry…a global first.

Part proceeds of the sale of these granitas goes to supporting our work.

To order these five fabulous flavours, email fortheloveofwildlife@gmail.com – two packets (minimum order) $25, one packet of each is $50, two of each $90 and we’ll happily quote for any combination you’d like. Strawberry, raspberry, mango, blueberry and passion fruit…delicious! (Postage additional)

http://fortheloveofwildlife.org.au/

Biography

Greg Brown is one of Australia’s finest chefs.

Author of several books and a myriad of gastronomic awards, owning restaurants and a chain of bakeries, Greg Brown is internationally renowned.

Growing up on a farm in the Western districts of Victoria, Australia where he developed a deep love of the land and animals.

To finance his university study he worked for local restaurants learning to be a cook.

After graduating in psychology Greg realised his real calling was the food industry so he set off for Europe.

His career in gastronomy commenced training under the wing of acclaimed French chefs Raymond Blanc at the Manoir aux Quatre Saisons and Michel Roux at the Waterside Inn. Greg was also fortunate enough to study at Ecole Lenotre in Versailles famed for its Patisserie and Boulangerie (bakery).

Greg’s rigorous training in Europe led to a significant level of knowledge in the food and catering business.

Returning to Australia Greg opened ‘Paysan’, a restaurant that was awarded many accolades including the ‘Restaurant of the Year’ for two years running. His subsequent restaurant ‘Browns’ was also an instant success awarded the ‘Restaurant of the Year’ six months after opening!

Greg continued on with his success as a reputed chef by extending into pastries and breads through a chain of stores ‘Brown’s Bakers of Distinction’.

In early 2000, Greg was diagnosed with a mild form of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and over the next few years suffered a number of personal setbacks, including the loss of his businesses, separation from his family and the onset of the debilitating symptoms.

Although physical limitations have affected his body’s agility his mind, palate and intimate knowledge of ingredients are still working overtime to develop new recipes and mastering his existing 700+ recipes.

Greg Brown

Australia Bans Lion Trophies and Body Parts

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Interspecies Communication

Anna Breytenbach is interviewed on O World Project where she talks about how humans are suffering from a separation sickness from Nature and all life on earth. Her amazing clarity of communication and how she expresses the quantum capacity we all have to reconnect if only we would take the time to sit and truly listen. Insightful and simple in connecting with animals and nature as we all have the capacity it’s just that we’ve become too busy of mind.

 

This pic below was taken whilst a group was finishing a meditation and in circle had been toning. In the middle of the afternoon a shy sea otter came out of the waves to see what was going on believing that it was something behind, as this was not normal human behaviour.

 

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There are so many ways you can have a relationship with animals. In this video Anna shows us, that with quiet connection to the animals, we all have the ability to communicate. If we are to live harmoniously on the earth together, we need to access other ways of being. In our hurried, technological world we don’t take time to be and feel our feet on the earth.

Anna talks to Spirit, the black leopard.