Lion cubs imported by private Australian zoo from South Africa’s canned hunting industry.

Ukutula, an industrial-sized predator facility outside Johannesburg, South Africa, has been in the firing line from conservationists and animal activists for over a decade. The place runs one of the most sophisticated lion cub petting, voluntourism and trading operations, and on countless occasions they have been exposed for selling their lions on to other operators once they are no longer good for their commercial operations.

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Where do these lion cubs come from and where do they end up? Photo credit: Ian Michler

The explosive documentary Blood Lions has exposed how the predator industry operates with scenes shot at Ukutula clearly showing as many as 27 lions cubs being handled by visitors and volunteers. The film asks the leading question “where do these cubs come from and where do they go”?

Ian Michler, lead role in the documentary states; “There is absolutely no conservation value whatsoever to breeding lions in captivity under these conditions, and especially so if they have been hand reared. These lions can never be released to the wild and volunteers are being conned into believing they are making a contribution to securing the future of lions.”

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Volunteers are paying up to US$1000 a week for the experience of handling cubs and Ukutula can have up to 25 volunteers at any given time, clearly a significant money spinner for the operation.

Australian Federal MP Jason Wood was so shocked at the damning evidence Donalea Patman, Founder of For the Love of Wildlife took to him that he worked with then Minister for Environment, Greg Hunt to do something as he felt canned hunting was morally reprehensible. Minister Hunt created a global first by banning the importation of lion trophies and body parts, a courageous and visionary step with France and the Netherlands following Australia’s lead. The USA government has since also implemented far stricter laws for importing lion trophies from Africa.

Despite consultation with the Government and a screening of Blood Lions in Parliament, a private zoo in New South Wales has been able to import cubs from Ukutula in South Africa.

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Senator Lee Rhiannon with For the Love of Wildlife founder, Donalea Patman, Ian Michler who is lead role in Blood Lions and investigative journalist, Minister Greg Hunt and economist Roderick Campbell, author of Ecolarge.

Ukutula has implemented a system of tracking their lions to assure buyers that they’re not destined for the canned hunting industry but given the information is confidential, you have to question how effective this is.  In addition, not a single recognized lion ecologist or predator conservation agency is working with them.

Ms Patman states; “We do not need more lions (or any big cats) in Australia. There’s absolutely no conservation value and we’re supporting this unscrupulous business by allowing these imports.”

“The world is outraged over the brutality of canned hunting and we’re trying to educate the tourism industry and volunteer groups not to engage in exploitative animal encounters – cub petting and lion walking being part of the canned hunting cycle. We are sending mixed messages allowing these cubs into Australia but saying don’t do it in other countries.”

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Billabong Zoo in Port Macquarie publicly states that it wishes to breed from these cubs. Are we not replicating the trend in South Africa which has been globally condemned  by conservation and animal welfare groups as purely exploitative practises?

Billabong Zoo Facebook page statement:

“In order to import lions to Australia both the Australian authorities and the South African authorities have a strict permitting process to ensure the animals are sourced from a legitimate and licensed facility and to ensure they are going to be used for conservation purposes. In Australia lions are treated as a CITES 1 species, a higher level of protection than anywhere else in the world. This means that they can only be imported as part of a conservation breeding and education program. The Australia CITES office did research Ukutula and were satisfied that they were not part of the canned hunting industry – if they weren’t satisfied we would never have been granted our import permit. These cubs were also approved by the Zoo Aquarium Association to be accepted into the Australian breeding program for lions – this approval process included the scrutiny of, and acceptance by a number of individuals involved in this organisation. Secondly, Ukutula themselves insisted that Billabong Zoo become a member of EcoScan, a program which offers lifetime tracking of individual animals to ensure they are only used for ethical purposes and are not part of the hunting industry. Ukutula could not be a member of EcoScan if they hadn’t already proven themselves to not be part of the canned hunting industry. Thirdly our zoo vet personally visited Ukutula to inspect the lion cubs and the facility prior to the transfer, and returned with nothing but praise for the operators, the staff, the facility and the animals. The process for Billabong Zoo to import lion cubs has been a huge undertaking, and one that we have spent years bringing together. These animals and the sending facility, Ukutula have been researched and accepted by various government bodies and zoo industry officials. Throughout the entire process Billabong Zoo has remained transparent with the sourcing and importation of these animals, and at no time has any government or zoo official raised concerns with how these animals were sourced. The cubs, Milo and Misty have travelled and settled extremely well and we are so proud of the impact these little ambassadors have already had in raising awareness about the plight of the African Lion.”

“There is in fact only one piece of post-doctoral research (2012 study by Dr Luders and others) in the list of 14 links. The only research of substance appears to have been the improved felid semen collection study by Dr Luders and others that is not even lion specific. It involved a very small proportion of the Ukutula lions (7 out of an estimated 100).  It does seem clear to us that Ukutula is primarily a commercial lion breeding venture, not a research facility.” Chris Mercer, Campaign Against Canned Hunting.

We are calling on the Australian Government to show consistency. We cannot condemn South Africa’s predator farms and the cycle of exploitation and then allow cubs from those same operators to be shipped here. In addition, we call on the Australian public to refrain from visiting these places; think before you visit and know that handling a wild animal commits them to a lifetime of misery with no chance of being reintroduced to the wild.

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Journeying into nature with deep reverence

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King and Queen.

Sacred Safari – May 2016

We made a conscious choice to work in the world differently, to take courageous leaps of faith and enter into the unknown and then find valid support for our efforts: this is why we chose to offer our first deep nature immersion journey. To share another perspective on entering the natural world, on what our impact as humans has on the silent and magical animal and nature realms.

Our first group was small but we had decided from the outset that regardless of the number of participants it was important to lay the foundation for this work, for these Sacred Safaris.

On our first day we gathered our fellow journeymen in Johannesburg, giving our guests time to recover from their long flights.

Those that were up for it took an afternoon at the Origin Centre at the University of the Witwatersrand which has fascinating exhibitions covering the depth of Africa’s history and Bushman heritage and it’s devastation due to European settlement. There  are beautiful artworks, intriguing artefacts and archaeological finds.

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We set out on our journey beginning at the sacred site of Adam’s Calendar near the tiny town of Kaapsche Hoop in Mpumalanga Province. Older than time itself, this rocky wilderness is protected by herds of wild horses.

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We have a history of visiting this site and it’s not always been as clear energetically as it was when we entered on the dusk of our first day. Beautiful large dolmens and other huge rocks stand like keepers, emitting their own heartbeat, a pulse emitted from the central heart. To enter into this landscape is surreal, the strange rock formations coupled with surrounding pine forests and organic moonscape of rocks.

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Adam’s Calendar is dated anywhere from 35,000 to 72,000 years old and is reminiscent of something like Glastonbury, without the extensive tourism and policing. The rock formations line up with constellations, celestial and seasonal events. Some time back, a group had started illegal excavation on the site and the scars are still visible.  Metal stakes were put deep into the soil between dolmens and around to measure the stars, the moon and the sun’s alignment and the energetics of what lay beneath. It’s common knowledge that when flying over the site in a small aircraft the instrumentation can either drop out or go haywire.

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Our entry into this natural kingdom was guided by a local woman, Mary Ross, who knows the area extremely well and showed us other energetic power points and portals. We had very powerful meditations and openings, which set the magical, mystical tone for our journey.

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None of the wild horses came close that day but the funky little village had quite an array of animals – all very happy to come and say hi and spend time with us.

Boondocks was the next stop with a very beautiful welcoming at the gate by the owner. It’s like entering the underworld. A stunning landscape of wild African bush and mountains with the accommodation right in the centre of surrounding mountains, not far from the Mozambique border.

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A shower with a view!

The outlook is breathtaking and the outdoor shower has the most magnificent view over a vast valley alive with leopard, baboons and buffalo  – an absolute must! The incredible offering by Anne and Stewart, who have lovingly developed this retreat centre, in what they hold on this land is exquisite. The highlight is the labyrinth they built which is an exact version of the one at Chartres.

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Such an incredible honour to be able to walk this labyrinth.

To walk this labyrinth on the land, in the middle of a forest and stream creates such a fine frequency, a direct portal to the inner and outer worlds, held by tree guardians. Both mystical, mythical and magical. One must experience it to be able to truly understand what is offered to the world. We had a difficult time saying goodbye, knowing we had deepened and opened ourselves to the animal kingdom, having full permission to enter.  Stewart’s wonderful stories and heightened intuitive perspectives were valued insights, his stories around the night fire had us all captivated and we found our hearts yearning for more. What they’ve created is remarkable, mostly a sharing of love and a great gift to the world. A universal architect who’s left a stunning and beautiful legacy.

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All the crew with Stewart on the left and Anne on the right.

Entry into the Kruger National Park welcomed us with amazing animal sightings on the bridge before we even entered the Malelane Gate. A multitude of animals greeted us just before we entered the park – crocodiles, hippo, multiple birds – an absolute celebration of life!

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A rare baby grounded hornbill.

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This adult grounded horn bill was with two others and two babies.

Our drive in was purposeful as we wanted to get to our accommodation, the Rhino Post Lodge, in time for the evening game drive – we were all bursting with excitement. Seeing a group of rare Ground Hornbills was such a treat, they were curious and friendly, the young ones coming very close to our vehicles.

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Our first night out we were blessed to see many rhino but being a full moon knew that protection for these animals is always paramount. We pray for their protection and that the senseless and cruel killing stops.

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The drought in Kruger brings many animals to man-made waterholes and watching hippos trying to stuff themselves in to tiny water sources is heartbreaking, they are certainly suffering the most.  We had seen a leopard kill, visible up a tree so our driver was committed to getting a sighting. We had a quick glimpse but scared the leopard with our driver not quite as sensitive and aligned with our intention.

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This guy really loved the toning.

The next morning we where all wide eyed and bushy tailed and headed out layered in warm clothing to meet the cold African winter dawn. Our guide was once again committed to seeing the shy leopard of the night before and got a little frustrated when we asked him to stop the vehicle and allow us time to connect in and calm our intentions. When you head out with a mission to see “something”, or to tick off a list of animals you want to see, you carry with you the energy of the “hunt”. Animals sense this and are long gone before you have a chance of a sighting – they pick up on another “predator” in the field.

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A newborn close to camp.

With our intentions softened, our gratitude activated and hearts open we started again. And what did we see? A rare Black Sable. At first it was indisdinguishable, looking like a man bent over in deep thought but then we saw the enormous black horns. Pan? He had been lying down and when he arose he took our breath away: in the distance he looked like a Centaur, our Pan, a Black Sable! We all knew the significance, and the rarity of such a sighting and were so excited and blessed to see such a magnificent creature.

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Such a rare sighting of this magnificent black sable.

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Hippos having a terrible time during the drought in Kruger.

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Trying to squeeze into whatever water they can find.

 

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A hippo in a dam with water levels very low, terrapins sunning themselves on it’s back.

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And then nature blessed us with it all. A herd of elephants of all ages from babies to matriarchs walked by, surrounded us, on their way to the dam. Hippos, rhino, giraffe, and the list goes on to the place where we stop to watch hippos, looking skinny in diminishing levels of water, terrapins using them to sun themselves. And we look to our left – leopard. Sitting atop a termite mound. Calm, relaxed, stretched out – shimmering. The jewel of the animal kingdom. Such exquisite beauty. Stella shared that they are the Kings of medicine. Ancient, wise, shape-shifters. Their fluid bodies move in sensual caress of the earth, collecting knowledge.

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We had it all, our drives included two golden lions mating just a few metres from our vehicle, with several males on the periphery about to compete with the dominant male. The tiniest owls, the enormous eagles – Crowned and Battler, mighty seers of the wilderness.

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The king and queen, the mating pair.

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On guard as other males close in on his territory.

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This lion moving in to challenge the mating couple.

On a night drive we came across a young hyena looking over the edge of a bridge and on our arrival she walked off. We were out of our vehicle on the bridge, on our guides invitation, all lights turned off looking down on hundreds of fireflies dancing on the river bank when our driver put on his torch and was surprised to see the hyena back on the bridge, strolling closer and closer to check us out. What an extraordinary meeting! No fear from either the three of us left standing or the hyena (did I mention half the group had returned to the vehicle…) just a curious exchange. We heard hyena calls all night – beautiful sounds, the soprano of the bush veld and early before dawn, there was a group very close to camp.

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Stella and I had awoken early and were first to get to the viewing platform to see a very similar hyena (in age and size) in the middle of the river bed, standing observing us before slowly wandering off on the loose sand.

A few days in Kruger was such a blessing, a numinous experience. Entering the animal kingdom with deep respect and reverence, being open hearted, calm and in love with nature really does invite the magical and profound. We left seeing more lions – the King and Queen in loving embrace. A herd of dozens of buffalo sitting in circle on a sandy river bank with elephants surrounding them, trumpeting and dusting themselves, all having to co-exist with the critical amounts of water available.

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We were astonished to see yet another huge herd of elephants in another waterhole having the absolute time of their lives splashing and playing, trumpeting and snorting, bathing, rubbing, looking out for the babies, the youngsters slapping the water with their trunks in complete celebration. The joy in their expression was something stunning to witness knowing that we too felt that celebration in what was shared with us in Kruger.

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The interactions with nature have left us all dramatically changed. You cannot take those experiences as anything other than a blessing. Deeply grateful for nature’s generosity and compassion we continued to attempt to express our deep love for the creatures and each other as our time together strengthened and deepened.

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A herd of buffalo had formed a circle, laying on the sand and elephants walking past to access the water.

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An incredible sighting.

Blyde River Canyon, the third largest canyon in the world, was our next destination to rest for a day, take it easy and have a nurturing and soft time to ourselves. To catch our breaths and have a gentle weaving back into life outside of the magical field of Kruger.

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Bush buck on the water’s edge.

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Kudu.

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Baby croc only 12 inches long. Apparently he’s going to be moved away.

We spent a morning on the water of the huge dam with the boat completely to ourselves. We stayed quiet and witnessed creatures along the shoreline go about their daily business – bushbuck, kudu, crocodile, hippo, baboons. The true beauty of the canyon seen from the centre, looking up at the amazing rock faces, waterfalls and scenery.

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On our way back to the lodge we stopped at the waterfall for a quick (freezing cold) dip for the brave at heart. This location, part of a UNESCO protected biosphere is where “I’m a Celebrity, Australia” was filmed. To see how they’ve damaged the area, built huts, paths and bridges, dumped piles of river sand sand from another biosphere at the waterfall, a site many consider to be a sacred feminine place shows their absolute lack of regards or sensitivity to the protected area. Locals and tourists who come from all over the world to see this spectacular canyon are locked out for 4-5 months whilst they prep and film. You get a sense of how insensitive big business can be and how money speaks – isn’t it astonishing that this kind of thing can go on in a UNESCO designated biosphere?  I’m sure they justify their use by donating money to local charities and foundations with little understanding of what their impact actually is. When wealthy networks can buy off poorly managed parks boards and buy their way in, promising to leave the site in it’s original condition and doing nothing of the sort when they’ve finished filming has no integrity.

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Icy cold!

The next day we ventured to the tops of the Drakensburg Mountain Range visiting a view site overlooking the Three Rondavals, part of the magnificent massive rock formations. We looked down on the very water way we’d been on the day before where the Blyde River snakes through the canyon. Such a dramatic shift of perspective to be way up high! Ruth knew of the ancient altar on the site,  hidden from most tourists, an initiation site to some highly regarded African mystics. We spent time there meditating and realised that the top of the altar, eroded from years of wind and weather, looked so much like the landscape, mirroring the mountains, gorges and rivers. We ventured into a township for some shopping time for our guests and bought huge bags of avocado, passionfruit and mandarins for R100 (about $10 Aussie).

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Windy and cold on the edge!

Our final and finishing piece was the White Lion Protection Trust. Seeing the Royals was something else. These are two arresting white lionesses – Nebu and Zihra, who looked stunning in the morning light, sitting like sphinxes in the rising sun. Linda Tucker (CEO and founder) shared the genesis and reasons for the twenty year old project, not just the physical but the purpose of their work in many realms – the metaphysical and ecological. We were very grateful to her for joining our drives and sharing her wisdom, taking in the starry night sky and the drives around the dry, thorny bushland of Timbavati, which translates as “the place where the star lions came down”.

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The gorgeous George who’s working at GWLT after being an anti-poaching ranger.

We also witnessed the two tawny lionesses on another piece of White Lion Trust land who were in hunting mode. They are Cleopatra and Tswalu and worked in tandem, hunting kudu. This was an incredible event to watch – seeing them work in stealth, one going around whilst one held her ground and then struck from the opposite side. We didn’t stay to see the end as we didn’t want to disturb their hunt – it’s hard work,  but we passed the kudu as we drove along the road, feeling their heightened awareness, their wide eyed alertness, the adrenalin at being targeted and hunted by an apex predator. The balance and power of natural world.

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A view of the rustic accommodation at White Lion Trust. Lovely to sleep in round rooms.

We were truly blessed to have such wonderful participants who wanted the depth of experience and heightened sensitivity to nature and her creatures. Who willingly and courageously followed our guidance, who trusted us implicitly. To work with Stella Horgan and Ruth Underwood has been a dream, such remarkable women who hold such refined sensitivity but have enormous and courageous hearts, authentic and solid. To journey with them and trust the unfolding of that which we’ve laid out, to have the level of joy, brilliance, heightened intuition and guidance of nature and the exquisite gifts afforded us. We are all very excited to share this work with the world and are already making plans for next year!

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Thank you to the courageous pioneers who walked with us, the dear and loved friends who held us whilst unable to physically join us, to the spirit, elemental and animals worlds who loved us deeply and held us safe.

To offer this work is a dream come true and allows us to continue campaigning for the rights for our non-human friends. To co-exist on this living earth in respect and harmony, to create heaven on earth for all.

African Tour May 2016

For the Love of Wildlife invites you on an African expedition to invigorate your relationship with the living earth and your wild soul.

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The ancient stones of Adam’s Calendar

Our 12 day South African journey embarks from Johannesburg to the rolling hills of Mpumalanga Province and Adam’s Calendar, a 35,000 year old site marked by monolithic rocks aligned to the stars and guarded by free roaming wild horses. Here we prepare for entry into the animal and natural kingdom.

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What makes this Conscious Safari different from others tours is our approach to and experience in nature. We believe in deep immersion and even deeper respect, that as we are humble nature reveals herself. This is not about watching wildlife through the lens of a camera, or from afar: we want you to feel her under your skin. To experience the subtleties and patterns, to be a sacred witness to whatever is revealed, to be absolutely, exhilaratingly present.

We are concerned about the plight of the natural world, hence our activist work: given all of our brilliant human talents and sense of superiority as a species we have destroyed key aspects of the very earth that supports us. We believe that it is time to engage our full capacity as humans and fire our passionate hearts for the living earth. We also seek to extend our activism to joyfulness rather than devastation, and to claim a sense of power from our vulnerable and authentic selves to slip into delight and wonder at our world.

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Our wish for you, our guest, is that you leave the safari with a profound and vivid connection to nature and a deepened connection to your authentic, wise self that enables expression and a joyful, courageous relationship with life.

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This magical tour provides an opportunity to experience the unbridled power, generosity and wisdom of wildlife, the wildness that opens our hearts with its vulnerability and mystery. We journey quietly with our hearts open to listen to and witness the animals and nature, to receive what is offered to us.

Our journey takes us to the Kruger National Park, a nature reserve bigger than the country of Israel, home to herds of dozens of elephants and all the iconic animals of the pristine indigenous African bush. This is where we will work with interspecies communication and bird language tools, deep passions of all facilitators.

From Kruger we travel to the third largest canyon in the world, the Blyde River Canyon in Limpopo Province, the northern ranges of the mighty Drakensberg Mountains, a primal, powerful world of rivers, awe inspiring peaks and magnificent scenery and bird life.

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Our expedition concludes in the world famous wilderness of Timbavati at the Global White Lion Protection Trust, home of the iconic and sacred White Lions. A highlight of our journey (after our solid preparation) will be spending time with the white lions of Timbavati at the Global White Lion Protection Trust, which is not open to the general public.

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These incredible beings are considered sacred by many cultures and holy people and present astonishing, unique encounters. Many indigenous people believe that the arrival of the white animals is significant and prophetic. Being on the sacred heartland of Tsau in Timbavati, the ancestral homeland of the white lion is a compelling and a once in a lifetime experience, made possible by sacred activists Linda Tucker, who was given the mantle Keeper of the White Lions by Shangaan Lion Queen Maria Khosa, and Jason Turner, lion ecologist who have both dedicated their lives to protecting these endangered animals.

Proceeds of this expedition go to fund For the Love of Wildlife’s work, the non profit organisation responsible for the Australian government’s decision to ban the importation of lion trophies and body parts, in a bid to stem traffic in endangered species and to bring an end to canned hunting, as told by the film Blood Lions which FLOW partnered in.  Donalea Patman is the founder and director of FLOW, one the leading sacred activists in the world.

Tour begins 18 May, 2016. 

Early bird discount applies for bookings confirmed before end of February. 

Group numbers are limited to maintain the integrity and quality of the experience. 

For further information, pricing and itinerary please contact us fortheloveofwildlife@gmail.com

Itinerary and pricing

 

Facilitators

Dlea for Web

Donalea Patman

Having travelled throughout her life the most defining and memorable moments have always involved animals. A passionate advocate for sentient beings, she has always held a deep love of nature.

A lifetime interest and study of personal development and spirituality lead to her involvement in Sacred Activism. Donalea launched For the Love of Wildlife to create a professional platform to campaign the plight of animals in Africa, Australia and New Zealand, raising awareness of the destructive forces annihilating the natural world. Her fascination with interspecies communication has lead her to participate in workshops with Anna Breytenbach, Alwyn Myberg, Craig Foster and most recently Jon Young, 8 Shields.

 

Stella Pilot

Stella Horgan is a lifelong traveller and lover of wilderness who came home to her native South Africa in 2011 after twelve years in Australia, where she ran a private practice specialising in coaching, psychotherapy, workshop facilitation and project management.

In 2013 she established NPO Zingela Ulwazi – Hunt for Wisdom, whose mission is to deliver critical information to rural South Africans with the objective to improve lives and custodianship of nature and wilderness. Stella lives in the Blyde River Canyon and is entirely in love with nature and committed to reclaiming land for wilderness. She is a meditator, mystic, artist and sacred activist.

 

 

Ruth Underwood

Ruth Underwood  is a mystic, spiritual teacher and retreat facilitator who spent her early years living in mostly rural settings in Uganda and South Africa where her deep sense of connection to the soul of Africa was formed. She has spent most of her career working with non-profits in South Africa, and leads sacred retreats in South Africa,  Egypt and India.  Ruth has a particular connection with the Nilotic meridian and all the sites along it, and on these retreats, shares her love for the heart of Mother Africa and her mysteries.

See www.mysticalplaces.org

AUSTRALIANS

To book your flights, travel insurance (compulsory), additional accommodation, stopovers or any other pre or post FLOW program travel, our recommended travel agent is Cassandra at Better World Travel. Not only can she take the stress out of your trip planning, but Cassandra has also offered to donate 5% of the cost of your travel insurance policy to FLOW.

Contact details are:

Cassandra Newbold, Specialist Ethical Travel Consultant
0449 234 074

bwt@easternhilltravel.com.au

http://www.betterworldtravel.com.au

Travel Advice – Visit or Volunteer

For the Love of Wildlife does not support wild animal interactions or animals in captivity. If wild animals, in their natural habitat, wish to interact it must solely be initiated by the animal without coercion, on the animal’s terms, sensitively explored by both.

South Africa is the home of predator breeding and canned hunting, two inter-related practices that use and abuse lions as well as other predators in the most horrific forms of commercial exploitation. Today, anywhere between 7 000 and 8 000 predators, most of them lions, are being kept in cages or confined areas on over 150 private farms across the country.

Used for a host of revenue streams, many ultimately will end up being shot in canned hunts. Annually, close to 800 lions are killed by trophy hunters in enclosed or confined areas with little or no chance of escape, while hundreds more get killed and shipped to the East for the burgeoning lion bone trade.

Despite the claims of the operators, all leading conservationists and lion ecologists agree there is absolutely no conservation merit whatsoever in these practices.

For volunteering at reputable conservation agencies please explore the options offered by:

  • IFAW
  • Drakenstein Lion Park
  • Global White Lion Protection Trust
  • FOUR PAWS
  • Panthera
  • Conservation International
  • African Wildlife Foundation
  • WildLands Trust
  • The Wilderness Foundation
  • Endangered Wildlife Trust
  • The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
  • Youth 4 African Wildlife
  • African Parks
  • Thula Thula Rhino Orphanage
  • Great Plains Conservation

We ask that anyone visiting South Africa and its regional neighbours such as Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe to please seriously consider the following:

  1. There is no need to be breeding lions in cages or enclosed areas as hand-reared, human-imprinted and genetically contaminated animals have no conservation value.
  2. While wild lions remain seriously threatened, this status has more to do with habitat loss and a loss of their prey base than it does with population numbers.
  3. If South Africa does need lions to start new populations in protected areas, these will come from existing wild stocks and not from captive-bred lions.
  4. Taking lion and other cubs away from their mothers is not a natural process and is done only to exploit the animals and you as the visitor or volunteer.
  5. Using lion breeding farms as an educational facility is like using fast-food outlets as a venue to teach about nutrition and good eating habits – it should not be done.
  6. No self-respecting researcher or scientific institution should condone these practices.
  7. Almost all trophy hunting in South Africa is canned hunting, which means the animal has been specifically bred for the bullet with little to no chance of escape.
  8. Authentic wildlife sanctuaries do not breed, trade or interact with the animals in any way.
  9. If you do find yourself on any lion farm, ask the serious questions: Why are they doing what they do? Where did these animals come from? And where are they going when they get older?

By supporting these facilities, either as a day visitor, volunteer or hunter you are directly contributing to the misinformation that confuses conservation messages and priorities.

It also results in a misdirection of valuable conservation funding away from the real threats facing wild lions.

If you wish to have high resolution or print quality of the following brochure just email us at fortheloveofwildlife@gmail.com

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For travel advice in Australia for ethical tourism contact:
Cassandra Newbold (Specialist Travel Consultant)
Better World Travel  0449 234 074

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E: bwt@easternhilltravel.com.au
W: www.betterworldtravel.com.au
www.facebook.com/betterworldtravel

50 Brunswick St, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065
ATAS Accreditation No. A10957