Donate Today

Your gift to For the Love of Wildlife today makes a tangible difference in our work in saving the world’s exquisite wildlife. We thank you for your support. We can’t do this work without you!

You can donate using Paypal, Credit Card or Direct Debit or consider setting up a monthly contribution.

All donations over $2 are tax deductible. 

Getting involved

A world without wildlife is an unimaginable reality but at the current rate of decimation we are in what scientists are calling the 6thmass extinction – we are seeing thousands of species disappear before our very eyes. With your help, we can effectively combat some of the critical issues facing our ancient, majestic and magnificent animals.

How to Donate

Deposit directly to our bank account or consider monthly direct donations, use Paypal or credit card.

For the Love of Wildlife Ltd – Westpac
BSB: 033 372 Account: 605 319 Swift Code: WPACAU2S

Planned Giving

Create a lasting conservation legacy by including For the Love of Wildlife Ltd in your planned giving.

Through planned giving, you can balance your financial goals and charitable interests, leaving a legacy for conservation while benefiting from significant tax benefits.

Legacy Gifts

Bequests

Leaving a Legacy for the wildlife by including For the Love of Wildlife Ltd in Your Will.

With a bequest, you can donate all or part of your estate to For the Love of Wildlife Ltd through your will.

Is a bequest right for me?

It is important to have a Will to ensure your estate is given to the people and causes you most care about. Making or updating your Will need not be expensive or complicated but you should seek legal advice and talk through how you wish your estate to be distributed. Reviewing your Will every few years is also important as circumstances change throughout your life such as marriage, sale of a property, birth of children or grandchildren.

How do I get started?

Suggested wording 

Simply give the following wording to your Solicitor to include in your Will or as a Codicil to your Will once you have decided what kind of gift you would like to include:

“I bequeath to the For the Love of Wildlife Ltd, ABN 20 807 354 752, to promote and support the protection of wildlife, (the residue of my estate) or the sum of (a specified sum), or my (specified items), free of all duties and taxes including, if any CGT, and the receipt of the Secretary or other authorised officer for the time being shall be a complete and sufficient discharge for the executor(s).”

If you have decided to leave a gift in your Will to For the Love of Wildlife Ltd, please let us know as we would like to welcome you as a Wildlife Guardian.  You can contact us info@fortheloveofwildlife.org.au or call (+61) 417 939 042.

Types of gifts in Wills

Residuary
The remainder of an estate after specific gifts have been disbursed.

Percentage
A percentage of either the residue or the entire estate.

Specific asset
Real estate shares, bonds or other particular items of value.

Pecuniary
A specific gift of cash.

If you love what we do, then please become a member. $20 a year is all it costs.

Thank you. We cannot do this work without your generous and kind support. The world’s wildlife needs you. 

The Journey Home & Return To Earth

Melbourne Elephant Ivory and Rhino Horn Crush Epilogue

Donalea Patman, Founding Director, For the Love of Wildlife

 

For the Love of Wildlife has taken very seriously its commitment to the #MelbourneCrush and #NoDomesticTrade campaign. While the act of destroying elephant ivory and rhino horn items aims to show that the only value they have is on a living animal, importantly, we must consider that these items represent the death of thousands of elephants and rhinos.

#MelbourneCrush held in Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne on World Wildlife Day, 2018. Jason Wood MP destroying ivory surrendered by the Australian Government to be #Gone4Good.

Elephants are incredible creatures with strong social structures and personalities. Just like us, they have intricate family systems.  Rhinos are as ancient as time, yet there are just 27,000 rhinos left in the wild today. These sensitive beings are fast disappearing before our very eyes.

On Saturday 3 March 2018, Australia marked World Wildlife Day with a powerful message about the importance of these majestic animals, by destroying elephant ivory and rhino horn.

Understandably, we have being considering what the epilogue must be for the items being crushed.

A heart-felt invitation has been received from internationally celebrated artist and Founder of the Human Elephant Foundation, Andries Botha, for the crushed ivory and horn, of these elephants and rhinos, to take the journey home and be returned to the earth in the land that they were born. The crushed items will be buried beneath a bronze memorial Andries is creating to honour Dr Ian Player and his conservation partner, Magqubu Ntombela.

Dr Ian Player with his dear friend and conservation partner, Magqubu Ntombela.

Andries was a very dear and close friend of Dr Ian Player who passed in 2015. For the Love of Wildlife is both honoured and humbled by Andries’ invitation, for these elephants and rhinos to complete their journey home.

“It is, in my opinion vitally significant to bring the crushed rhino horn and elephant tusk home to the ancestral lands of these ancient creatures, where not only their bodies exist as essential components of our ecosystems, but where their ancestral presence and voices originate.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

I finish with a message from Andries.

We from the Human Elephant Foundation commend and support For the Love of Wildlife Ltd and the Australian supporters of the Melbourne Crush event.

It is critical that countries who are a part of the wildlife traffic economy take a courageous stand in support of wildlife that is now particularly vulnerable, as poachers, organised crime syndicates, corrupt governments and private and corporate business become more bold in their commodification of wild life products. It is imperative that we stand for these endangered animals. 

It is, in my opinion, vitally significant to bring the crushed rhino horn and elephant tusk home to the ancestral lands of these ancient creatures, where not only their bodies exist as essential components of our ecosystems, but where their ancestral presence and voices originate.

We are honoured to take custodianship of the crushed remains of these animals, to bury them beneath a monumental memorial sculpture soon to be erected to honour Magqubu Ntombela and Dr Ian Player, who saved the White Rhino from extinction in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and to repatriate them to the land they belong to.

A maquette of the memorial.

Andries Botha, South African Sculptor and Founder, Human Elephant Foundation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush, 1pm Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne 3 March

30% of Africa’s savanna elephants KILLED in 7 years. Rhinos left to DIE after having their faces cut off.

A perceived value in their tusks and horn for trinkets, carvings and status is driving this poaching crisis. Elephants and rhinos will be gone before we know it unless immediate GLOBAL ACTION is taken.

What can Australia and New Zealand do to protect these iconic species?

Enact a full domestic ban on the sale of ivory and rhino horn. Australia and New Zealand continue to allow an unregulated domestic trade, providing gaps for recently poached and trafficked items to be sold through our markets.

In September 2016 Donalea Patman OAM (For the Love of Wildlife), Dr Lynn Johnson (Natureneedsmore), Fiona Gordon (Gordon Consulting) and Rebecca Keeble (IFAW) met with Minister Josh Frydenberg to hand deliver IFAW’s “Under the Hammer” report exposing the rampant trade in Australia and NZ, and a communique signed by 56 Australian and International organisations calling for a full domestic trade ban – this alone should have warranted action.

Melbourne Crush ambassador, internationally acclaimed designer Collette Dinnigan AO, says; “As an Australian who was born in South Africa, I know that for Africa’s people to thrive its wildlife must also thrive.  Worldwide, any trade in elephant ivory or rhino horn that provides traffickers the opportunity to launder ivory and rhino horn from recently killed animals, must be decisively closed, this includes Australia and NZ. It is time to protect these magnificent animals, for our children.”

SURRENDER your ivory and rhino horn items to be DESTROYED to demonstrate that their only value is on a living animal. Drop items at reception, Melbourne Zoo beforehand if you can’t attend but wish to support this initiative, knowing too well that all ivory and rhino horn items are from the killing of a rhino or elephant, no matter its age.

Melbourne’s largest auction house Leonard Joel joins the call for a full domestic trade ban with latest Leonard Digital Newsletter promoting World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush.

If you wish to do something real for elephants and rhinos, please give generously – we can’t do this without you – Paypal or email info@fortheloveofwildlife.org.au

Stand up for elephants and rhinos by attending this historic Australian event. Send a loud and clear message that we want this trade #Gone4Good. For further event details click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working together towards the Melbourne Crush:

3 Degrees

Qantas

Save African Rhino Foundation

Born Free Foundation 

Zoos Victoria

Stephen Powell Photography/Wildlife Artist

Chris Gretch Design

Wisdom Graphics

Structured Events

 

We cannot stay silent whilst elephants and rhinos are brutally poached – their survival is in our hands.

An enormous thank you to internationally acclaimed designer Collette Dinnigan AO who knows just how important Africa’s wildlife is to its country, to its people. A true hero for wildlife, Colette’s commitment, hard work and passion has helped bring these extraordinary people together.

We cannot be silent and watch the brutal poaching crisis. Australia and New Zealand’s unregulated domestic trade allows for illegally trafficked items to be sold through our markets. Waiting for someone else to act isn’t a character trait of these extraordinary individuals.

All for the love of elephants and rhinos.

 

Australia Bans Lion Trophies and Body Parts

March 13, 2015 Environment Minister Greg Hunt announced an immediate ban on the importation of lion hunting trophies and body parts as a direct response to the cruel and barbaric industry of captive breeding and canned hunting.

A global first, Minister Hunt took a courageous and visionary step in helping the critical decline in Africa’s lions and showed the world that there’s no place for this industry in our civilised society.

For the Love of Wildlife has been instrumental in working with Jason Wood MP, Federal Member for La Trobe in taking this issue to the Federal Government. Ian Michler, internationally renowned conservationist and lead role in Blood Lions Movie attended a meeting with Minister Hunt in October 2014 with For the Love of Wildlife founder Donalea Patman and Economist Roderick Campbell, Australia Institute and author of Ecolarge.

Since the announcement Senator David Leyonhjelm has tabled a disallowance motion which will be tabled in the Senate for debate August 12, 2015.

March 16 Ian Michler presented to the EU Parliament to share the news on the Australian announcement and also inspire decision makers, politicians, media and the public to consider following Minister Hunt’s lead.

OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

Thank you for your interest in the Australian Government’s proposal to introduce trade restrictions for African lion (Panthera leo) specimens.

On 13 March 2015, the Australian Government introduced a measure to treat specimens of African lion as though they are listed on Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). This measure affects Australian import and export of lion specimens, and bans trade in African lion hunting trophies.

The measure was introduced following extensive consultations with African lion range states, businesses, hunters, conservation organisations, and researchers. Any potential impacts on hunters, hunting operations in range states, and businesses that support hunting of African lions have also been analysed.

This measure has been introduced in response to Australian public concerns about ‘canned hunting’ of African lions.

African lions are listed internationally on Appendix II of CITES. African lions are also protected under Australia’s national environmental law, the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). In accordance with CITES Article XIV and the EPBC Act, Australia may introduce domestic measures that further restrict trade in CITES listed species.

The introduction of this measure means that trade in lion specimens to and from Australia, including trade in hunting trophies, will be restricted to a limited number of circumstances, for example, for conservation breeding or scientific purposes. Trade in hunting trophy specimens will not be allowed unless the specimens were obtained before the provisions of CITES came into effect for lions, i.e. the specimen is from an animal that was deceased prior to 1977.

Australian CITES import and export/re-export permits issued up to and including 12 March 2015 will remain valid for trade until the permit is used or expires (whichever occurs first).

Further information is available at http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/wildlife-trade/cites/stricter-measures/african-lion

Please direct any queries regarding the new measure to wildlife.communications@environment.gov.au

Yours Sincerely,

Ilse Kiessling
Acting Assistant Secretary
Wildlife Trade and Biosecurity Branch
Department of the Environment

Projects we support

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