CITES – it’s time to fix the basics

During the time addressing the domestic trade in Australia in relation to elephant ivory and rhino horn, For the Love of Wildlife and Nature Needs More have become very concerned about the existing CITES trade permit and monitoring system. In addition, the evidence presented at the Parliamentary Inquiry into the unregulated domestic trade last year in Australia provided a platform for further shocking information to be exposed.

Attached is a letter that we sent to the Mr David Morgan in September 2018 as a result of what has been revealed, knowing we can no longer remain silent and action must be taken. At the time David Morgan was performing the administrative duties of the CITES Secretary General and we decided not to wait for the new CITES’ Secretary General to be appointed, due to there being no indication of how long this would take and it was appearing to drag out.

With the reverse listing and levy approach we are asking CITES signatories to consider before CoP18 as we feel that this offers a potential solution to fixing the significant problems and loopholes in the current legal trade system that is enabling illegal items to be laundered into the legal market place.

Please note, in sending this letter, this does not mean that we endorse the sustainable use model and the fact that a trade body is the key facilitator of managing the world’s precious flora and fauna. In sending this letter we acknowledge that this trade based approach will not be changed to a conservation focused approach in the short-term. As such, what we have currently needs to evolve to implement trade and control systems that are transparent, tamper-proof, appropriately resourced and fit-for-purpose.

In introducing this proposal to your local politician (wherever you are in the world) may we offer the following as a foundation for your email to assist in gaining their full attention. If you wish to do more, then please follow up with a meeting and share what you know in educating them in knowing the critical demise of the world’s majestic and iconic species. If you are not knocking on your local MP’s door, then their attention will be with the people who are! Wildlife requires action and please do not feel intimidated by a meeting – your local MP is there to represent YOU and your concerns.

You can also send the information to your local paper – MP’s respond to local news.

Thank you, on behalf of the animals and the natural world who need you now.

 

Dear ….

The last 18 months has seen an increased global focus on wildlife crime, as new estimates regarding the massive scale of illegal trafficking were published in the World Customs Organisation 2017 Illicit Trade Report. This report highlighted the estimated profit from the illegal trade in flora and fauna to be between $91- 258 billion USD per year, and stated, this is an amount that is, according to the United Nations Environment Programme, growing at 2-3 times the pace of the global economy. The report concluded, environmental crime is now the fourth largest transnational crime, after drug trafficking, counterfeiting and people trafficking. International organized crime uses the systemic loopholes in the legal trade system which is regulated by the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). In addition to the illegal trade, in 2012 a UK government paper highlighted the value of the legal trade in flora and fauna to be $320 billion USD per year.

In addition to systemic loopholes, CITES now lists more than 35,000 species for trade restrictions, making identification and enforcement an impossible task for national law enforcement and customs bodies. Within the CITES framework the only solution to this escalating problem is to change the listing regime to default to a ‘reverse listing’ mode, i.e. listing only species in which trade is permitted. This is not a new idea, in fact it was first put forward by Australia in 1981 to the CITES Conference of Parties in New Dehli. At the time only 700 species were listed for trade restrictions and it was perhaps unsurprising that the proposal failed to garner sufficient support.

Set up as a non-self-executing treaty, CITES today lacks the funding to help poorer countries to implement effective electronic permitting systems that are integrated with global customs systems, which is essential to close the loopholes exploited by the traffickers. We propose that a small trade levy on the $320 billion USD per year trade conducted legally under CITES rules could help raise the necessary funds and make the overall system tamper-proof, traceable and transparent.

Only national governments (and the EU), which are signatories to CITES, can propose the necessary changes to fix the flaws in the current system and strike decisively against the illegal trade. Attached to this email is a copy of a letter sent to the CITES Secretariat in September 2018. As we are one of the 183 signatory parties, I request that the reverse listing approach proposed be considered by our government in the run-up to and as part of the agenda of the Conference of the Parties (CoP18) in Sri Lanka in May 2019.

Yours sincerely

 

…………………………………………………..

Open Letter regarding CITES Issues

(include the above link in your email)

We’d love to know which countries are active, so please let us know as we’d love to keep a track of how many people are getting on board. Also feel free to email Peter Lanius of Nature Needs More if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask!

 

The greatest chase you’ll never get to see!

 

THE GREAT Gazelle Chase is hotting-up to be one of the biggest and most unusual fundraising events of the year that, hopefully, you will never get to see!

On Saturday, November 3, conservation organisation, For the Love of Wildlife (FLOW), will be hosting a one-of-a-kind event on St Kilda Beach to raise funds to tackle the out-of-control wildlife trade that is driving some of the world’s most iconic species to extinction.

The fundraising event is being held to support Nature Needs More to raise funds for its rhino horn demand reduction campaign. For the Love of Wildlife aims to raise at least $10,000 so that a fake gazelle, performed by Married At First Sight star Matty Lockett, does not end up getting chased around the beach by a marauding pride of wildlife lovers.

The initiative is all part of the World Games for Wildlife, created by Nature Needs More. From November 5-21, people all over the world will come together for the inaugural games by doing  something active like playing sport or hosting events – all to raise funds for innovative projects tackling the illegal wildlife trade.

Founding Director of FLOW, Donalea Patman is encouraging everyone to dig deep to help save not only the gazelle, but to help save animals that have been decimated by poaching and trade such as lions, elephants and rhinos, one of which is killed every 8 hours for its horn.

Matty Lockett, who’s prepared to be the gazelle for The Great Gazelle Chase and do his part for the world’s iconic wildlife and FLOW Founding Director, Donalea Patman.

“It’s a tongue-in-cheek event to get more Australians thinking about our wildlife’s welfare. We’re global citizens and we have a global responsibility to protect wildlife. It doesn’t matter if the battle is in Africa or in Australia, it all needs our urgent attention,” Donalea said.

Dr Lynn Johnson, founder of Nature Needs More, also believes Australians can do more to help tackle the illegal wildlife trade. “Wildlife is now being used as a status symbol in some cultures around the world. Rhino horn, for example, is being used to conduct business deals,” Lynn said.

“There’s a terrible disconnect with the natural world at the moment. In Australia, it’s shocking to hear about people running over emus, killing hundreds of wedge-tailed eagles, and fairy penguins and getting nothing more than a slap on the wrist. At the same time, there’s a huge connection with sport and if we can raise awareness of the plight of wildlife via the sporting arena that’ll be fantastic,” Lynn added.

From a young age, Matty Lockett, who appeared on the hit TV show Married At First Site, fell in love with wildlife and believes all of wildlife should be protected. “It all came from my father, who grew up in the country and was pretty passionate against any form of animal hunting and that’s definitely rubbed-off on me,” Matty said. “I have a very short amount of time to get fit so please donate as much as you can!”

Donalea added: “If we can’t save elephants, lions and rhinos from extinction then there’s little chance of saving anything else.”

Donate today and #savethegazelle!
https://events.natureneedsmore.org/fundraisers/fortheloveofwildlife/The-Great-Gazelle-Chase

Parliamentary Inquiry recommends full domestic trade ban in ivory and rhino horn

The Australian Joint Committee on Law Enforcement parliamentary inquiry report, chaired by Craig Kelly MP, recommends a full domestic trade ban.

This is an incredibly positive step in Australia fulfilling its obligations as a signatory to CITES to address it’s unregulated domestic trade.

We’ve been working with Jason Wood MP over the past 2.5 years to expose the depth of wildlife trafficking in Australia and that the industry is unregulated and unenforced, allowing rampant trade in ivory and rhino horn.

We’ve provided evidence including auction rooms and antique dealers who openly flout the law, advising prospective customers how to get items in and out of the country illegally.

Read full report here:

Parliamentary Inquiry Report

 

Australia…we have blood on our hands

Australian filmmakers Augusta Miller and Michael Dahlstrom are backing a call on the Australian Government to ban the sale of ivory and rhino horn in Australia.

The pair joined forces with conservation group For the Love of Wildlife to create a social media commercial driving home a message that Australia has blood on its hands whilst allowing trade in ivory and rhino horn. It comes ahead of the outcome of the Parliamentary Inquiry into Australia’s ivory and rhino horn trade.

Miller said she felt compelled to do something to make a difference when she learned these items could still be sold in Australia.

“Like most Australians I had no idea that it’s still legal to sell ivory and rhino horn. When I found out I felt overwhelmed by a desire to do something about it.

“It’s despicable. It needs to stop. It’s the only ethical choice,” she said.

Dahlstrom agreed with the need to end the trade to ensure the survival of two of the world’s most iconic animals which are now facing extinction.

“It’s unfathomable that we’re allowing this trade to continue when one elephant is killed every 15 minutes for its ivory, and a rhino every eight hours for its horn.

“Unless our government takes action to end it, we’ve all got blood on our hands,” he said.

Miller’s mother, actress Sandy Gore, provided the voiceover for the commercial after hearing about the parliamentary inquiry into the trade.

“In the 1970s I was gifted two ivory bracelets. At the time I was in my early 20’s and had no concept of the degree of devastation these items had caused for elephants.

“I can’t change what happened to those elephants but I can do something now, however small, to give back and say enough is enough,” she said.

In March this year the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement launched the inquiry into Australia’s ivory and rhino horn trade. Evidence has been heard from the Department of Environment, non-government organisations, antiques and auction industry, Customs and online selling platforms including Facebook.

While the importing and exporting of ivory and rhino horn is regulated, it remains legal to buy and sell domestically.

For the Love of Wildlife has been working closely with Federal MP Jason Wood to end Australia’s ivory and rhino horn trade. The group has released shocking footage of antique dealers selling ivory they can’t determine the age of and advising customers how to illegally smuggle it out of the country.

Founding Director, Donalea Patman said damning evidence of the extent of wildlife trafficking in Australia had been presented through the inquiry and that there is overwhelming support to ban the ivory and rhino horn trade.

“It’s naively assumed any ivory and rhino horn in Australia must have entered the country legally, yet we’ve seen that the systems used to regulate international trade such as the CITES permit system and trade database have major shortfalls,” she said.

“Through the inquiry we’ve heard Australians are ordering ‘kill on demand’ for ivory and rhino horn from Tanzania and Kenya. We also heard of a case in Australia where a trafficker was caught with several rhino horns, ivory and cash, but was never prosecuted despite a water tight case.

“Traffickers already have a perception of wildlife crime being a low-risk, high-reward activity and Australia perpetuates this,” Patman said.

In response to those who believe Australia’s trade may be small compared to countries like China or Vietnam, Patman says the true volume of Australia’s trade is unknown.

“We’ve witnessed thousands of items for sale across just a handful of stores and online platforms, and in all of these cases, there wasn’t any documentation to prove an item’s age or legality. At best, sellers guess the age of items based on visual appearance.

“As long as our government allows for a legal domestic trade, we’ll continue providing opportunities for traffickers to launder illegal ivory and rhino horn into our legal domestic market,” she said.

“It makes us complicit in the poaching crisis and it’s a responsibility the Australian Government cannot ignore.

“We’re deeply touched and incredibly grateful to Augusta, Michael and their team for creating such a powerful ad with a message that we know will hit home for all Australians,” she said.

The ad can be seen at fortheloveofwildlife.org.au

In April this year the UK Government announced its ban on the domestic sale of ivory in a bid to help protect elephants. The move came after a public consultation process where more than 60,000 people showed their support to end the trade.

We need you to help stop the trade of elephant ivory and rhino horn in Australia.

Write to the Minister for the Environment, Hon Melissa Price MP TODAY.

Here’s a sample email you can copy and paste to the Minister at Melissa.Price.MP@aph.gov.au

Dear Minister

Every day that the domestic trade in elephant ivory or rhino horn continues, Australia legitimises the desire for these luxury wildlife ‘products’, stimulates demand and drives the current rhino and elephant killing spree.

Any legal market, including Australia’s, provides an opportunity to launder recently poached, illegal ivory and rhino horn and, as such, contributes to poaching and the illegal wildlife trade. 

I want Australia to take a stand and legislate for a complete domestic trade ban on elephant ivory and rhino horn, no matter the age.

Yours sincerely

 

How we have tried to stop this brutal trade in Australia.

For the Love of Wildlife has been working with its collaborative partners NatureNeedsMore and Gordon Consulting for the past two years, investigating Australia’s domestic trade in ivory and rhino horn.

Africa’s iconic elephants and rhinos are facing crisis with one elephant killed every 15 minutes for its tusks and one rhino every eight hours for its horn. At this rate experts are predicting they could be extinct in the next 10 years.

Australia’s trade in ivory and rhino horn provides opportunity for items from recently killed elephants and rhinos to be sold through our markets. The demand (in any country) is driving the brutal killing spree. Alarmingly, there are no checks and balances in Australia’s unregulated trade to prevent items from recently killed elephants and rhinos being sold in our own backyard.

From left to right: Rebecca Keeble (IFAW), Dr Lynn Johnson (NatureNeedsMore), Fiona Gordon (Gordon Consulting), Minister Josh Frydenberg and Donalea Patman (For the Love of Wildlife).

In September 2016 we met with Energy and Environment Minister, Josh Frydenberg with a communique calling for a full domestic trade ban. The response from the government was that the trade in Australia isn’t contributing to the poaching crisis and our laws, regulations and processes are sufficient to ensure this isn’t the case. The communique was signed and supported by 56 Australian and international organisations. This warranted immediate action.

It wasn’t enough.

Part of the Federal Government’s response was that the issue of domestic trade and enforcement rests with State governments, not Federal. So we wrote to the Environment Ministers for each state to ask them. As we expected, the responses stated that the domestic trade is indeed a Federal Government responsibility. This also warranted immediate action.

It wasn’t enough.

We then called on members of the Australian public to write letters and upload images to social media to demonstrate their support for stopping this brutal trade and do our part in stopping the poaching crisis.

All of the people we spoke to were genuinely shocked that it’s still legal to buy and sell ivory and rhino horn in Australia, and believe that it should be banned. Hundreds of letters were sent to Minister Frydenberg’s office and hundreds of photos were uploaded to social media. This demonstrated strong support from the public for a domestic trade ban.

This wasn’t enough.

In August 2017 a workshop was held with key stakeholders working with a Federal MP to share our findings and the evidence we’d collected. Following the workshop we provided the Department of Environment and Energy with draft legislation for a domestic trade ban. We’ve heard nothing back from the government on this draft.

It wasn’t enough.

We rallied the public on World Wildlife Day – Saturday 3 March 2018 – and hosted Australia’s first ivory and rhino horn crush event in Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne. The event was attended by Federal MP Jason Wood to show the world that the only value ivory and rhino horn has is on a living animal. Hundreds of people came to show their support with people surrendering items they had bought, been gifted or inherited from family members, for crushing.

Australia’s first public crush of ivory and rhino horn on World Wildlife Day, 3 March 2018. Demonstrating that the only value is on a living animal. (Jason Wood MP in hat crushing ivory).

Internationally applauded designer Collette Dinnigan AO was event Ambassador and the call for a domestic trade ban gained overwhelming support from high profile individuals including Aussie rock legend John Farnham, actress Asher Keddie, Dr Jane Goodall and former NZ Prime Minister, Helen Clark.

The Melbourne Crush received attention from a variety of media including 7 News, The Age, ABC, National Geographic and international agencies.

This STILL wasn’t enough.

On 28 March 2018, the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement initiated an inquiry into the trade in elephant ivory and rhino horn.

We must make sure this is enough.

This is the last window to make sure the Australian Government hears your loud and clear call for a full domestic trade ban on ivory and rhino horn.

If you feel passionately about this, and we know you do, then we ask that you write and include your voice in the submission process. Take action and be part of doing something real to stop the brutal slaughter of elephants and rhinos through a submission for this inquiry. It’s time this ugly trade is #Gone4Good.

We MUST have an overwhelming response so that there’s NO question that Australia enacts a FULL DOMESTIC TRADE BAN.

What will it take?

The Government has evidence to act. Whilst they go about “business as usual” we are watching elephants and rhinos disappear before our very eyes.

Write to Minister for the Environment Hon Melissa Price MP TODAY.

Here’s a sample email you can copy and paste to the Minister at Melissa.Price.MP@aph.gov.au

Dear Minister

Every day that the domestic trade in elephant ivory or rhino horn continues, Australia legitimises the desire for these luxury wildlife ‘products’, stimulates demand and drives the current rhino and elephant killing spree.

Any legal market, including Australia’s, provides an opportunity to launder recently poached, illegal ivory and rhino horn and, as such, contributes to poaching and the illegal wildlife trade.

I want Australia to take a stand and legislate for a complete domestic trade ban on elephant ivory and rhino horn, no matter the age.

Yours sincerely

South Africa’s fly in, fly out brutal hunting industry

A billboard designed to tackle “canned” lion hunting has been rejected by Airports Company South Africa Or Tambo International Airport, the gateway to South Africa.

The move came ahead of this week’s colloquium on South Africa’s predator breeding industry.

Aimed at deterring the brutal practice of canned hunting where tame, hand-reared lions are shot in confined area, the billboard shows a child holding a plastic toy gun with the message ‘skill level required to be a lion hunter’.

Donalea Patman, Founding Director, said the industry is all about a quick, cost effective and guaranteed kill.

“These so-called hunters buy the lion online before they arrive in South Africa and love to tell a story of how they supposedly shot a rogue beast that was threatening a local community.”

“What they actually shot was a tame animal that was likely to have been drugged and then baited to approach the vehicle, having being fed this way for much of its short life,” Patman said.

“It takes the skill of a child to shoot such an animal and that’s the message of our billboard which ACSA has rejected,” she said.

Recently Safari Club International and Dallas Safari Club, two of the biggest US hunting groups, stated they were distancing themselves from the canned hunting industry. The move comes amidst significant pressure from the Blood Lions campaign and global condemnation of the abhorrent industry.

The industry is also known for deceiving well-intentioned volunteers who pay thousands of dollars to hand-raise lion cubs, believing they will be released into the wild. Volunteers are often left distraught upon finding out their beloved cub has been bred purely for the bullet and they have been used as part of a shady supply chain.

“Hunters will shoot these lions with several bullets to the body and maybe then through the ear or eye to make sure the head remains a good trophy to stick on their wall,” Patman said.

“The intensive breeding of these lions is driving demand for lion products and impacting wild populations. We’ve been told of wild cubs being stolen to reinvigorate genetics of farmed lions and we know that the industry is also fuelling the lion bone trade.”

“Lions are one of the planet’s most iconic species and they are heading toward extinction. I think it’s absolutely appalling that staff at OR Tambo Airport have made an unfounded decision to block an ad that would play an important role in stopping their demise,” she said.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature currently lists lions as vulnerable (population decreasing) and indicates a 43 percent decline in lion populations between 1993 and 2014.

Staff at ACSA Or Tambo Airport said the decision to reject the billboard had no relevance to advertising codes of practice and was on the grounds of “not entertaining advertisements whereby children are associated with hunting and guns”.

Ms Patman said the response was unacceptable.

“The ad shows a child with a plastic toy gun and reality is children play with these toys. It’s not about a child engaging in violence or hunting.”

“They have asked us to redesign our ad but we’re not going to do that. It’s been designed to drive home the message that these so-called hunters aren’t hunters at all and they should feel embarrassed for shooting a tame, confined lion,” Ms Patman said.

The South African colloquium being held in Cape Town has heard evidence from economists who estimate that R$54 billion could be lost in tourism revenue if the barbaric industry continues.

“Many people we’ve spoken to will no longer travel to South Africa because of its consumptive and commodified approach to its precious wildlife, addicted to old paradigms including ‘if it pays it stays’, Ms Patman said.

“People are angry at poachers but we aren’t addressing the rich who pay to kill these animals for fun,” she said.

In 2015 Patman put the plight of Africa’s lions and the canned hunting industry on the Australian radar and worked with government to see Australia become the first country in the world to ban the import of lion trophies and body parts. The ban was implemented just months before Cecil the famous lion was killed.

Press in South Africa Traveller24 
And the results from Traveller24 poll.

FLOW submissions to the Parliamentary Inquiry

 

For the Love of Wildlife’s #NoDomesticTrade campaign, with collaborative partners Nature Needs More and Gordon Consulting, NZ has resulted in a Parliamentary Inquiry in Law Enforcement.

Working for more than two years in investigating the unregulated domestic trade, coming to a head in hosting Australia’s first and historic #MelbourneCrush where we destroyed ivory and rhino horn surrendered by the Government and the public to demonstrate that the only value horn and tusks have is on a living animal.

We know that Australian’s want his trade #Gone4Good with almost everyone we’ve interviewed or spoken to during this time is shocked and appalled that it isn’t already banned. Thank you to Jason Wood MP for his commitment to saving the magnificent and majestic elephants and rhinos.

Submission by Donalea Patman

Attachment to submission by Donalea Patman – Ivory Items

Submission by Hayley Vella

All submissions to the Parliamentary Inquiry can be found here:

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Joint/Law_Enforcement/Elephantivoryrhinohorn/Submissions

Jason Wood MP tables Private Member’s Motion to close the Australian domestic trade in ivory and rhino horn.

Monday 23 October Jason Wood MP tabled a Private Member’s Motion to the House of Representatives in Canberra.

Jason championed the ban on lion trophies and body parts which was announced by then Environment Minister Greg Hunt in March 2015, before the death of Cecil, the famous lion killed by US dentist Walter Palmer.

The collaboration of For the Love of Wildlife with Fiona Gordon of Gordon Consulting NZ and Nature Needs More (previously Breaking the Brand) has exposed the serious flaws not only in the CITES reporting, but also Australia’s failure to prosecute with hundreds of confiscations and seizures over a period 2010 – 2016.

There’s a global call to close ALL markets and we’re very excited that Jason Wood is again stepping up for Africa’s iconic species.

Hansard from Monday’s Motion.

New Zealand Government to continue allowing ivory and rhino horn to be sold domestically

Sadly, the New Zealand Government will continue trailing world leaders in saving elephants and rhino from extinction, saying it will not introduce a ban to stop the domestic sale of ivory and rhino horn.

The Government’s intention comes despite phenomenal public support for a ban. Over the past month more than 2,000 letters have been sent to Parliament calling for the government to stop the sale of ivory and rhino horn in the country.

As we continue losing one elephant every 15 minutes and a rhino every eight hours to poaching, governments around the world have announced plans to end their domestic trade of ivory and rhino horn. China announced its ivory and rhino horn ban last year, with Hong Kong also announcing its ban to stop the sale of ivory by 2021. Tougher regulations for ivory trade are already in place in the US.

Australia is also tackling the issue with Federal MP Jason Wood tabling in the House of Representatives, the elephant and rhino poaching crisis, and Australia’s domestic trade in Parliament just last week.

Ivory for sale at Donelly’s Auction Rooms, Mt Lawley, Western Australia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime cites New Zealand as a source, transit and destination for wildlife contraband, reporting the country’s “staggering” number of confiscations. Seizures have doubled to almost 6,000 in 2015.

The National Government considers New Zealand’s domestic trade in ivory to be made up of “functional” products – bagpipes and pianos – and old statutes and carvings. This is despite a nine-month investigation by IFAW showing that 60% of ivory in New Zealand’s domestic market is carvings, statutes and tusks. Furthermore, less than one in 10 of the ivory lots had any documentation showing evidence of their age or origin.

Considering the IUCN and CITES have called on all nations to close their domestic ivory markets, the news from New Zealand is extremely disappointing. With the real threat that our elephants and rhinos will be extinct in the next ten years, we need leadership and immediate action from all nations, including New Zealand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International press include the following:

https://www.iol.co.za/mercury/environment/need-for-global-response-to-curb-wildlife-crime-11201816

https://conservationaction.co.za/media-articles/australia-new-zealand-letting-elephant-rhino/

http://www.sabreakingnews.co.za/2017/09/12/australia-and-new-zealand-letting-elephant-and-rhino-down/

https://etn.travel/australia-and-new-zealand-letting-elephant-and-rhino-down-31670/

http://travelwirenews.com/australia-and-new-zealand-letting-elephant-and-rhino-down-2-402168/

http://www.15minutenews.com/article/130685607/australia-and-new-zealand-letting-elephant-and-rhino-down/

http://www.netwerk24.com/Nuus/Omgewing/rondloper-olifante-gered-en-terug-in-natuur-20170912

Time for a targeted ad campaign to up the anti against the horrendous canned hunting industry

Were you sick to your stomach when you heard US dentist Walter Palmer killed Cecil? This industry is far worse.

Every day in South Africa lions are bred for the bullet. Factory farmed for trophy hunters; these tame, hand reared lions are brutally slaughtered in small, high fenced areas. They are often baited and drugged, targets of the unskilled. These lions endure several bullets ending in a slow and painful death. Leaked footage exposes the horrors, including terrified lions being shot out of trees or whilst hiding in warthog holes. This is the canned hunting industry.

More than 8,000 lions waiting to die in horrific death camps.

Captive breeding and canned hunting is for those who want a quick, guaranteed, and cheap kill. A fly-in fly-out arrangement. Yep, lazy “hunters” that want an animal to come to them. Cubs bred for this industry are rented to tourist attractions, then lion walking activities, and finally returned to cramped and filthy conditions waiting to be bought online – and shot.

GET ON BOARD

Despite global outrage, the industry of breeding lions for ‘fun’ still thrives.  Unfortunately wild lions are also targeted by lion farmers. Prides are killed and cubs are stolen, all to reinvigorated the breeding stock for this industry.

With lions critically endangered, it’s time to stop killing for fun.

We are sick and tired of the hunting propoganda – hunters call themselves conservationists (remember we’re the bunny huggers) but what type of person kills a tame lion?

Captive bred lions unfortunately have no conservation value. Being genetically impaired, they have no future. This is yet another reason to stop the incessant breeding.

We need your help in funding this desperately needed campaign.

DONATE NOW – Pozible Crowd Funding

About For the Love of Wildlife

For the Love of Wildlife was the driver behind the Australian ban on the importation of lion trophies and body parts in 2015. A global first, this saw France and the Netherlands follow, with the US also implementing stricter import measures.

Join us in saving lions. We cannot bear to witness the continued exploitation of the King, a symbol of courage, strength and wisdom. Our lions deserve to be revered and protected, not cruelly and inhumanely exploited for profit.

It’s time to stop the brutal slaughter and close down this filthy industry for good.

What happens behind the fences.

WARNING: Graphic content.

Footage exposing the horrors of a canned hunt.