We need you to help stop the trade of elephant ivory and rhino horn in Australia.

For the Love of Wildlife has been working with its collaborative partners NatureNeedsMore and Gordon Consulting for the past two years, investigating Australia’s domestic trade in ivory and rhino horn.

Africa’s iconic elephants and rhinos are facing crisis with one elephant killed every 15 minutes for its tusks and one rhino every eight hours for its horn. At this rate experts are predicting they could be extinct in the next 10 years.

Australia’s trade in ivory and rhino horn provides opportunity for items from recently killed elephants and rhinos to be sold through our markets. The demand (in any country) is driving the brutal killing spree. Alarmingly, there are no checks and balances in Australia’s unregulated trade to prevent items from recently killed elephants and rhinos being sold in our own backyard.

How we have tried to stop this brutal trade in Australia.

From left to right: Rebecca Keeble (IFAW), Dr Lynn Johnson (NatureNeedsMore), Fiona Gordon (Gordon Consulting), Minister Josh Frydenberg and Donalea Patman (For the Love of Wildlife).

In September 2016 we met with Energy and Environment Minister, Josh Frydenberg with a communique calling for a full domestic trade ban. The response from the government was that the trade in Australia isn’t contributing to the poaching crisis and our laws, regulations and processes are sufficient to ensure this isn’t the case. The communique was signed and supported by 56 Australian and international organisations. This warranted immediate action.

It wasn’t enough.

Part of the Federal Government’s response was that the issue of domestic trade and enforcement rests with State governments, not Federal. So we wrote to the Environment Ministers for each state to ask them. As we expected, the responses stated that the domestic trade is indeed a Federal Government responsibility. This also warranted immediate action.

It wasn’t enough.

We then called on members of the Australian public to write letters and upload images to social media to demonstrate their support for stopping this brutal trade and do our part in stopping the poaching crisis.

All of the people we spoke to were genuinely shocked that it’s still legal to buy and sell ivory and rhino horn in Australia, and believe that it should be banned. Hundreds of letters were sent to Minister Frydenberg’s office and hundreds of photos were uploaded to social media. This demonstrated strong support from the public for a domestic trade ban.

This wasn’t enough.

In August 2017 a workshop was held with key stakeholders working with a Federal MP to share our findings and the evidence we’d collected. Following the workshop we provided the Department of Environment and Energy with draft legislation for a domestic trade ban. We’ve heard nothing back from the government on this draft.

It wasn’t enough.

We rallied the public on World Wildlife Day – Saturday 3 March 2018 – and hosted Australia’s first ivory and rhino horn crush event in Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne. The event was attended by Federal MP Jason Wood to show the world that the only value ivory and rhino horn has is on a living animal. Hundreds of people came to show their support with people surrendering items they had bought, been gifted or inherited from family members, for crushing.

Australia’s first public crush of ivory and rhino horn on World Wildlife Day, 3 March 2018. Demonstrating that the only value is on a living animal. (Jason Wood MP in hat crushing ivory).

Internationally applauded designer Collette Dinnigan AO was event Ambassador and the call for a domestic trade ban gained overwhelming support from high profile individuals including Aussie rock legend John Farnham, actress Asher Keddie, Dr Jane Goodall and former NZ Prime Minister, Helen Clarke.

The Melbourne Crush received attention from a variety of media including 7 News, The Age, ABC, National Geographic and international agencies.

This STILL wasn’t enough.

On 28 March 2018, the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement initiated an inquiry into the trade in elephant ivory and rhino horn.

We must make sure this is enough.

This is the last window to make sure the Australian Government hears your loud and clear call for a full domestic trade ban on ivory and rhino horn.

If you feel passionately about this, and we know you do, then we ask that you write and include your voice in the submission process. Take action and be part of doing something real to stop the brutal slaughter of elephants and rhinos through a submission for this inquiry. It’s time this ugly trade is #Gone4Good.

We MUST have an overwhelming response so that there’s NO question that Australia enacts a FULL DOMESTIC TRADE BAN.

What will it take?

You can lodge your submission here: https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Joint/Law_Enforcement/Elephantivoryrhinohorn

The Government has evidence to act. Whilst they go about “business as usual” we are watching elephants and rhinos disappear before our very eyes.

We also encourage you to call Prime Minister’s office on (02) 9327 3988 (International callers +61 2 9327 3988) and Minister for Energy and Environment, Josh Frydenberg at either his electoral office on (03) 9882 3677 (International +61 3 9882 3677) or Ministerial office (02) 6277 7920 (International +61 2 6277 7920) TODAY.

The Journey Home & Return To Earth

Melbourne Elephant Ivory and Rhino Horn Crush Epilogue

Donalea Patman, Founding Director, For the Love of Wildlife

 

For the Love of Wildlife has taken very seriously its commitment to the #MelbourneCrush and #NoDomesticTrade campaign. While the act of destroying elephant ivory and rhino horn items aims to show that the only value they have is on a living animal, importantly, we must consider that these items represent the death of thousands of elephants and rhinos.

#MelbourneCrush held in Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne on World Wildlife Day, 2018. Jason Wood MP destroying ivory surrendered by the Australian Government to be #Gone4Good.

Elephants are incredible creatures with strong social structures and personalities. Just like us, they have intricate family systems.  Rhinos are as ancient as time, yet there are just 27,000 rhinos left in the wild today. These sensitive beings are fast disappearing before our very eyes.

On Saturday 3 March 2018, Australia marked World Wildlife Day with a powerful message about the importance of these majestic animals, by destroying elephant ivory and rhino horn.

Understandably, we have being considering what the epilogue must be for the items being crushed.

A heart-felt invitation has been received from internationally celebrated artist and Founder of the Human Elephant Foundation, Andries Botha, for the crushed ivory and horn, of these elephants and rhinos, to take the journey home and be returned to the earth in the land that they were born. The crushed items will be buried beneath a bronze memorial Andries is creating to honour Dr Ian Player and his conservation partner, Magqubu Ntombela.

Dr Ian Player with his dear friend and conservation partner, Magqubu Ntombela.

Andries was a very dear and close friend of Dr Ian Player who passed in 2015. For the Love of Wildlife is both honoured and humbled by Andries’ invitation, for these elephants and rhinos to complete their journey home.

“It is, in my opinion vitally significant to bring the crushed rhino horn and elephant tusk home to the ancestral lands of these ancient creatures, where not only their bodies exist as essential components of our ecosystems, but where their ancestral presence and voices originate.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

I finish with a message from Andries.

We from the Human Elephant Foundation commend and support For the Love of Wildlife Ltd and the Australian supporters of the Melbourne Crush event.

It is critical that countries who are a part of the wildlife traffic economy take a courageous stand in support of wildlife that is now particularly vulnerable, as poachers, organised crime syndicates, corrupt governments and private and corporate business become more bold in their commodification of wild life products. It is imperative that we stand for these endangered animals. 

It is, in my opinion, vitally significant to bring the crushed rhino horn and elephant tusk home to the ancestral lands of these ancient creatures, where not only their bodies exist as essential components of our ecosystems, but where their ancestral presence and voices originate.

We are honoured to take custodianship of the crushed remains of these animals, to bury them beneath a monumental memorial sculpture soon to be erected to honour Magqubu Ntombela and Dr Ian Player, who saved the White Rhino from extinction in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and to repatriate them to the land they belong to.

A maquette of the memorial.

Andries Botha, South African Sculptor and Founder, Human Elephant Foundation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush, 1pm Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne 3 March

30% of Africa’s savanna elephants KILLED in 7 years. Rhinos left to DIE after having their faces cut off.

A perceived value in their tusks and horn for trinkets, carvings and status is driving this poaching crisis. Elephants and rhinos will be gone before we know it unless immediate GLOBAL ACTION is taken.

What can Australia and New Zealand do to protect these iconic species?

Enact a full domestic ban on the sale of ivory and rhino horn. Australia and New Zealand continue to allow an unregulated domestic trade, providing gaps for recently poached and trafficked items to be sold through our markets.

In September 2016 Donalea Patman OAM (For the Love of Wildlife), Dr Lynn Johnson (Natureneedsmore), Fiona Gordon (Gordon Consulting) and Rebecca Keeble (IFAW) met with Minister Josh Frydenberg to hand deliver IFAW’s “Under the Hammer” report exposing the rampant trade in Australia and NZ, and a communique signed by 56 Australian and International organisations calling for a full domestic trade ban – this alone should have warranted action.

Melbourne Crush ambassador, internationally acclaimed designer Collette Dinnigan AO, says; “As an Australian who was born in South Africa, I know that for Africa’s people to thrive its wildlife must also thrive.  Worldwide, any trade in elephant ivory or rhino horn that provides traffickers the opportunity to launder ivory and rhino horn from recently killed animals, must be decisively closed, this includes Australia and NZ. It is time to protect these magnificent animals, for our children.”

SURRENDER your ivory and rhino horn items to be DESTROYED to demonstrate that their only value is on a living animal. Drop items at reception, Melbourne Zoo beforehand if you can’t attend but wish to support this initiative, knowing too well that all ivory and rhino horn items are from the killing of a rhino or elephant, no matter its age.

Melbourne’s largest auction house Leonard Joel joins the call for a full domestic trade ban with latest Leonard Digital Newsletter promoting World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush.

If you wish to do something real for elephants and rhinos, please give generously – we can’t do this without you – Paypal or email info@fortheloveofwildlife.org.au

Stand up for elephants and rhinos by attending this historic Australian event. Send a loud and clear message that we want this trade #Gone4Good. For further event details click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working together towards the Melbourne Crush:

3 Degrees

Qantas

Save African Rhino Foundation

Born Free Foundation 

Zoos Victoria

Stephen Powell Photography/Wildlife Artist

Chris Gretch Design

Wisdom Graphics

Structured Events

 

We cannot stay silent whilst elephants and rhinos are brutally poached – their survival is in our hands.

An enormous thank you to internationally acclaimed designer Collette Dinnigan AO who knows just how important Africa’s wildlife is to its country, to its people. A true hero for wildlife, Colette’s commitment, hard work and passion has helped bring these extraordinary people together.

We cannot be silent and watch the brutal poaching crisis. Australia and New Zealand’s unregulated domestic trade allows for illegally trafficked items to be sold through our markets. Waiting for someone else to act isn’t a character trait of these extraordinary individuals.

All for the love of elephants and rhinos.

 

Newspaper Articles and Reports

Parliamentary Joint Committee into rhino horn and elephant ivory

 

Australian ivory trade’s role in encouraging poaching to come under scrutiny – 5 April 2018

 

World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush

 

National Geographic Australia – 2 March 2018

By Michael Smith

 

 

 

 

The Conversation – 12 March 2018

 

 

 

 

Sydney Morning Herald – 23 February 2018

By Amy Croffey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sydney Morning Herald – 3 March 2018

By Neelima Choahan & Shiamak Unwalla

 

 

 

 

ABC News – 4 March 2018

By  Tynan King

 

 

 

 

7 News Melbourne

By Melina Sarris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ranges Trade Mail – 6 March 2018

By Peter Douglas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buro 24/7 – 8 March 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Running Billboards

Captive Breeding and Canned Hunting

Bryan Seymour, 7 News covers the chilling footage brought to light by safari cameraman Derek Gobbett.

7 NEWS September 2016

Explosive footage and the truth exposed by Derek Gobbett, a safari cameraman accompanying 10 hunters on De Klerk Safaris concession hosted by Stormberg Elangeni Safaris. This is the full story which was featured in the recent BBC story.

A Parliamentary Inquiry into the register of Environmental Organisations who focus work on issues outside of Australia, wanting their deductible gift recipient status removed. This article by Roderick Campbell lays it bare.

https://newmatilda.com/2016/05/19/breaking-down-party-lions/

The Federal Election in Australia had us featured as part of Jason Wood’s election campaign. Jason Wood held his seat in the electorate of La Trobe with support of the Animal Justice Party.

Election Press 28:06:16 Full pageElection Press 28:06:16 Story

Media on CACH’s withdrawal from I’m a Celebrity, Network Ten, Australian Reality TV

Bryan Seymour, 7 News 14 March 2016

Lucy Mae Beers, Daily Mail Australia 16 March 2016

Ebony Bowden, Sydney Morning Herald, 16 March 2016

Courier Mail, 16 March 2016

Scoopla, 16 March 2016

 

The Animals Post 2015 UK, 2015

International Business Times – 31 March, 2015

Mojo (Monash Journalism) 16 March, 2015

sponsors13

 

By Isabel McCrea, IFAW Australia published 13 March, 2015.

IFAW Article

 

Daily Maverick

By Peter Borchert, South Africa 15 March 2015

Peter Borchert

sponsors-fourpaws

 

By FOUR PAWS International

FOUR PAWS

 

The Guardian

By Oliver Milman, 13 March 2015

Nova Magazine March Edition by Jeremy Ball

 

Article Mail Newspaper, 4 March, 2015

Mail 4 March 2015

Article Herald Sun, Victoria, 3 March, 2015

Herald Sun 3 March 2015

Article Saturday Star, Johannesburg, December 6, 2014

Joburg Sat Star Dec 6

Joburg Sat Star Full Page

 

Article The Mail, March 4, 2014

The Mail 8 July 2014 -2

The Mail 8 July 2014 -1

Ecolarge-2013-200m-question

Leader Community Newspaper, July 4, 2014

Simon Bloch, Durban reports on Australian Government’s initiative (Sunday 6 July, Weekend Argus)

S Bloch, Sth Africa

Article The Mail, March 4, 2014

Newspaper article 3 March

Jason Wood MP tables Private Member’s Motion to close the Australian domestic trade in ivory and rhino horn.

Monday 23 October Jason Wood MP tabled a Private Member’s Motion to the House of Representatives in Canberra.

Jason championed the ban on lion trophies and body parts which was announced by then Environment Minister Greg Hunt in March 2015, before the death of Cecil, the famous lion killed by US dentist Walter Palmer.

The collaboration of For the Love of Wildlife with Fiona Gordon of Gordon Consulting NZ and Nature Needs More (previously Breaking the Brand) has exposed the serious flaws not only in the CITES reporting, but also Australia’s failure to prosecute with hundreds of confiscations and seizures over a period 2010 – 2016.

There’s a global call to close ALL markets and we’re very excited that Jason Wood is again stepping up for Africa’s iconic species.

Hansard from Monday’s Motion.

Australia…No Domestic Trade!

Despite what many Australians might believe, elephant ivory and rhino horn is sold in Australia.

International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) released their “Under the Hammer” report, exposing how much ivory and rhino horn is being sold through auction rooms.

The report identified that only 2.7 per cent of items inspected at Australian auction rooms had ‘provenance’ documentation which provides the most useful information to determine the origin and legality of an item.

Items for sale in Chapel Street, Melbourne.

At least three rhinos are brutally slaughtered daily and one elephant is killed every 15 minutes. The South African government released rhino poaching statistics for 2016, reporting 1,054 rhinos has been killed.

A privately funded Great Elephant Census states that African elephant populations have declined by 30 per cent over the last seven years.

The Chinese Government announced it will close its ivory market by the end of 2017 and it’s time Australia does too.

 

Print out the Speak Out Letter and post to the Minister. Details are on the letter and you don’t have to be living in Australia.

 

In September 2016 the Australian Government was asked to enact a total ban on the domestic trade of elephant ivory and rhino horn in a communiqué that was hand delivered to Minister for the Environment and Energy, Josh Frydenberg.

Signed by over 50 conservation organisations from around the world, the ban would be a move to ensure Australia commits to playing its role in saving elephants and rhinos from extinction in the wild in the near future.

The communique was presented by Australian NGO founders Donalea Patman (For the Love of Wildlife) and Dr Lynn Johnson (Breaking The Brand) together with Fiona Gordon of New Zealand based environmental firm Gordon Consulting and Rebecca Keeble of IFAW.

Ms Patman has been disappointed with the response from Minister Frydenberg and the apparent confusion about who is responsible for dealing with illegal ivory or rhino horn.

“The response was that Australia is unlikely to be driving the elephant poaching or international illegal trade,” Ms Patman said.

“On top of that, ivory was found for sale in Western Australia in December 2016 which didn’t have the required documentation (shocking to see that ivory appears in their catalogue again in February).

It was first reported to the Australian Federal Police who then referred it to State Police, who then passed it to Border Control,” she said.

“There is clearly confusion about who is responsible and a lack of political will to demonstrate leadership on this issue,” she said.

Items for auction in Mt Lawley in December 2016.

The threat of extinction of these iconic species remains high. In November last year Vietnam hosted the third International Wildlife Trade Conference in Hanoi.

The Duke of Cambridge and President of United for Wildlife, Prince William attended the conference and delivered a speech on tackling illegal wildlife trade. In his speech he stated “A betting man would still bet on extinction”.

Follow the campaign on Facebook and use the following hashtags #NoDomesticTrade #EyesOnIvory #RhinosMatter #NotOnMyWatch

Print out these posters, take a selfie with it and post to our Facebook page…show Australia that it’s time. The Australian Government needs the public to show that it cares deeply about saving these iconic African animals.

Print out the Speak Out Letter and post to the Minister. Details are on the letter and you don’t have to be living in Australia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Print out these posters, take a selfie with it and post to our Facebook page…show Australia that it’s time. The Australian Government needs the public to show that it cares deeply about saving these iconic African animals.

 

The communique that was hand delivered to the Minister in September 2016. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional press:

SA Breaking News 13 Nov 2017

Lowvelder Press 13 November 2017

SA Breaking News

15 Minute News

Traveller 24

Netwerk 24

The Mercury

 

 

New Zealand Government to continue allowing ivory and rhino horn to be sold domestically

Sadly, the New Zealand Government will continue trailing world leaders in saving elephants and rhino from extinction, saying it will not introduce a ban to stop the domestic sale of ivory and rhino horn.

The Government’s intention comes despite phenomenal public support for a ban. Over the past month more than 2,000 letters have been sent to Parliament calling for the government to stop the sale of ivory and rhino horn in the country.

As we continue losing one elephant every 15 minutes and a rhino every eight hours to poaching, governments around the world have announced plans to end their domestic trade of ivory and rhino horn. China announced its ivory and rhino horn ban last year, with Hong Kong also announcing its ban to stop the sale of ivory by 2021. Tougher regulations for ivory trade are already in place in the US.

Australia is also tackling the issue with Federal MP Jason Wood tabling in the House of Representatives, the elephant and rhino poaching crisis, and Australia’s domestic trade in Parliament just last week.

Ivory for sale at Donelly’s Auction Rooms, Mt Lawley, Western Australia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime cites New Zealand as a source, transit and destination for wildlife contraband, reporting the country’s “staggering” number of confiscations. Seizures have doubled to almost 6,000 in 2015.

The National Government considers New Zealand’s domestic trade in ivory to be made up of “functional” products – bagpipes and pianos – and old statutes and carvings. This is despite a nine-month investigation by IFAW showing that 60% of ivory in New Zealand’s domestic market is carvings, statutes and tusks. Furthermore, less than one in 10 of the ivory lots had any documentation showing evidence of their age or origin.

Considering the IUCN and CITES have called on all nations to close their domestic ivory markets, the news from New Zealand is extremely disappointing. With the real threat that our elephants and rhinos will be extinct in the next ten years, we need leadership and immediate action from all nations, including New Zealand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International press include the following:

https://www.iol.co.za/mercury/environment/need-for-global-response-to-curb-wildlife-crime-11201816

https://conservationaction.co.za/media-articles/australia-new-zealand-letting-elephant-rhino/

http://www.sabreakingnews.co.za/2017/09/12/australia-and-new-zealand-letting-elephant-and-rhino-down/

https://etn.travel/australia-and-new-zealand-letting-elephant-and-rhino-down-31670/

http://travelwirenews.com/australia-and-new-zealand-letting-elephant-and-rhino-down-2-402168/

http://www.15minutenews.com/article/130685607/australia-and-new-zealand-letting-elephant-and-rhino-down/

http://www.netwerk24.com/Nuus/Omgewing/rondloper-olifante-gered-en-terug-in-natuur-20170912

Time for a targeted ad campaign to up the anti against the horrendous canned hunting industry

Were you sick to your stomach when you heard US dentist Walter Palmer killed Cecil? This industry is far worse.

Every day in South Africa lions are bred for the bullet. Factory farmed for trophy hunters; these tame, hand reared lions are brutally slaughtered in small, high fenced areas. They are often baited and drugged, targets of the unskilled. These lions endure several bullets ending in a slow and painful death. Leaked footage exposes the horrors, including terrified lions being shot out of trees or whilst hiding in warthog holes. This is the canned hunting industry.

More than 8,000 lions waiting to die in horrific death camps.

Captive breeding and canned hunting is for those who want a quick, guaranteed, and cheap kill. A fly-in fly-out arrangement. Yep, lazy “hunters” that want an animal to come to them. Cubs bred for this industry are rented to tourist attractions, then lion walking activities, and finally returned to cramped and filthy conditions waiting to be bought online – and shot.

GET ON BOARD

Despite global outrage, the industry of breeding lions for ‘fun’ still thrives.  Unfortunately wild lions are also targeted by lion farmers. Prides are killed and cubs are stolen, all to reinvigorated the breeding stock for this industry.

With lions critically endangered, it’s time to stop killing for fun.

We are sick and tired of the hunting propoganda – hunters call themselves conservationists (remember we’re the bunny huggers) but what type of person kills a tame lion?

Captive bred lions unfortunately have no conservation value. Being genetically impaired, they have no future. This is yet another reason to stop the incessant breeding.

We need your help in funding this desperately needed campaign.

DONATE NOW – Pozible Crowd Funding

About For the Love of Wildlife

For the Love of Wildlife was the driver behind the Australian ban on the importation of lion trophies and body parts in 2015. A global first, this saw France and the Netherlands follow, with the US also implementing stricter import measures.

Join us in saving lions. We cannot bear to witness the continued exploitation of the King, a symbol of courage, strength and wisdom. Our lions deserve to be revered and protected, not cruelly and inhumanely exploited for profit.

It’s time to stop the brutal slaughter and close down this filthy industry for good.

What happens behind the fences.

WARNING: Graphic content.

Footage exposing the horrors of a canned hunt.

 

Order of Australia

Founder of For the Love of Wildlife, Donalea Patman, has been awarded the Order of Australia Medal (OAM) for services to animal welfare.

In what started with a humble letter to her local MP Jason Wood, Donalea put the plight of Africa’s lions and the canned hunting industry on the Australian radar.

Just 18 months later the former Environment Minister Greg Hunt made the decision for Australia to become the first country to ban the importation of lion trophies and body parts.

Reflecting on her campaign to ensure Australia plays its part in the protection of one of the world’s most iconic species, Donalea recalls meeting Pippa Hankinson at an event in December 2012, Producer of Blood Lions, a documentary exposing the canned hunting industry.

“We happened to catch the same flight out and on that flight, we both pledged to do more for lions.

“Pippa went on to make Blood Lions and I started reaching out to people to see what role Australia could play,” Donalea said.

Leading up to a Federal election Donalea started writing to the candidates about the plight of Africa’s lions.

“I had approached Government to act on behalf of our youth who were being duped into participating in the canned hunting industry.

“They thought they were raising orphaned cubs as part of a conservation effort, but little did they know they were unwittingly raising cubs that are bred for the bullet,” Donalea said.

She then received a phone call from MP Jason Wood who she described as being shocked at the statistics and appalled at the canned hunting industry.

“He (Jason) said if he was elected he would do something to help.

“Jason championed the work, resulting in tripartisan support to get the changes necessary in enacting a ban on the importation of lion trophies and body parts,” Donalea said.

In recognition of her prestigious award, Donalea reflects on the support and mentoring she has received throughout her journey to date, particularly from Ian Michler, the Specialist Consultant and lead role in the Blood Lions documentary.

Meeting with Minister Greg Hunt – Ian Michler, Jason Wood MP, Donalea Patman (next to Donalea, out of picture Roderick Campbell).

“He trusted me from the very beginning. Ian was integral to the process, supplying scientific evidence, industry information and relevant reports.

“He also introduced me to key stakeholders and willingly travelled to Australia to meet with Jason Wood and Minister Greg Hunt,” Donalea said.

At the Global March for Lions in March 2015, Donalea hosted an event at Federation Square, Melbourne, to announce the Australian ban.

“We had a massive screen linked to Ian in South Africa to announce the ban.

“It was one of the proudest days of my life to see a man who’s been fighting to stop this industry for around 20 years wipe tears away on the announcement,” she said.

Crowd at Federation Square, Melbourne to watch the announcement of the ban on lion trophies and body parts, a global first.

When asked what advice she has for others who want to make a difference for wildlife, Donalea was more than happy to share some words of wisdom.

“I truly believe that if you want to make a change in the world you must be courageous to take a leap of faith.  With commitment and determination, we all have the capacity to make a positive impact,” she said.

“I come from a design background and yet somehow, through my love of wildlife and the power of not being able to stay silent about an industry that is so abhorrent, I found a way to do something.

“I’m deeply grateful to Pippa and Ian, and honoured to be in Jason Wood’s electorate,” Donalea said.

Although lions remain her passion, Donalea is now focusing her expertise to impact the plight facing elephants and rhinos. She is leading the #NoDomesticTrade Australia project to have the Australian Government implement a domestic trade ban on the sale of ivory and rhino horn within the country.

Order of Australia

On Australia Day 2017 the Queen’s Birthday Honours List, Donalea was announced as recipient of the Medal of the Order of Australia in the General Division within the Australian honours system for service to animal welfare.

The Order of Australia is an order of chivalry established by Letters Patent on 14 February 1975 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on the advice of Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. Appointments to the Order of Australia is the pre-eminent means by which Australia confer recognition for outstanding achievement or meritorious service of its citizens. Membership to the society of honour is by merit, independently assessed and free of political interference.

The Queen is the Sovereign Head of the Order of Australia and the Governor General is the Principal Knight and as Chancellor is charged with the administration of the Order.