FLOW submissions to the Parliamentary Inquiry

 

For the Love of Wildlife’s #NoDomesticTrade campaign, with collaborative partners Nature Needs More and Gordon Consulting, NZ has resulted in a Parliamentary Inquiry in Law Enforcement.

Working for more than two years in investigating the unregulated domestic trade, coming to a head in hosting Australia’s first and historic #MelbourneCrush where we destroyed ivory and rhino horn surrendered by the Government and the public to demonstrate that the only value horn and tusks have is on a living animal.

We know that Australian’s want his trade #Gone4Good with almost everyone we’ve interviewed or spoken to during this time is shocked and appalled that it isn’t already banned. Thank you to Jason Wood MP for his commitment to saving the magnificent and majestic elephants and rhinos.

Submission by Donalea Patman

Attachment to submission by Donalea Patman – Ivory Items

Submission by Hayley Vella

All submissions to the Parliamentary Inquiry can be found here:

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Joint/Law_Enforcement/Elephantivoryrhinohorn/Submissions

Donate Today

Your gift to For the Love of Wildlife today makes a tangible difference in our work in saving the world’s exquisite wildlife. We thank you for your support. We can’t do this work without you!

You can donate using Paypal, Credit Card or Direct Debit or consider setting up a monthly contribution.

All donations over $2 are tax deductible. 

Getting involved

A world without wildlife is an unimaginable reality but at the current rate of decimation we are in what scientists are calling the 6thmass extinction – we are seeing thousands of species disappear before our very eyes. With your help, we can effectively combat some of the critical issues facing our ancient, majestic and magnificent animals.

How to Donate

Deposit directly to our bank account or consider monthly direct donations, use Paypal or credit card.

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Planned Giving

Create a lasting conservation legacy by including For the Love of Wildlife Ltd in your planned giving.

Through planned giving, you can balance your financial goals and charitable interests, leaving a legacy for conservation while benefiting from significant tax benefits.

Legacy Gifts

Bequests

Leaving a Legacy for the wildlife by including For the Love of Wildlife Ltd in Your Will.

With a bequest, you can donate all or part of your estate to For the Love of Wildlife Ltd through your will.

Is a bequest right for me?

It is important to have a Will to ensure your estate is given to the people and causes you most care about. Making or updating your Will need not be expensive or complicated but you should seek legal advice and talk through how you wish your estate to be distributed. Reviewing your Will every few years is also important as circumstances change throughout your life such as marriage, sale of a property, birth of children or grandchildren.

How do I get started?

Suggested wording 

Simply give the following wording to your Solicitor to include in your Will or as a Codicil to your Will once you have decided what kind of gift you would like to include:

“I bequeath to the For the Love of Wildlife Ltd, ABN 20 807 354 752, to promote and support the protection of wildlife, (the residue of my estate) or the sum of (a specified sum), or my (specified items), free of all duties and taxes including, if any CGT, and the receipt of the Secretary or other authorised officer for the time being shall be a complete and sufficient discharge for the executor(s).”

If you have decided to leave a gift in your Will to For the Love of Wildlife Ltd, please let us know as we would like to welcome you as a Wildlife Guardian.  You can contact us info@fortheloveofwildlife.org.au or call (+61) 417 939 042.

Types of gifts in Wills

Residuary
The remainder of an estate after specific gifts have been disbursed.

Percentage
A percentage of either the residue or the entire estate.

Specific asset
Real estate shares, bonds or other particular items of value.

Pecuniary
A specific gift of cash.

If you love what we do, then please become a member. $20 a year is all it costs.

Thank you. We cannot do this work without your generous and kind support. The world’s wildlife needs you. 

We need you to help stop the trade of elephant ivory and rhino horn in Australia.

For the Love of Wildlife has been working with its collaborative partners NatureNeedsMore and Gordon Consulting for the past two years, investigating Australia’s domestic trade in ivory and rhino horn.

Africa’s iconic elephants and rhinos are facing crisis with one elephant killed every 15 minutes for its tusks and one rhino every eight hours for its horn. At this rate experts are predicting they could be extinct in the next 10 years.

Australia’s trade in ivory and rhino horn provides opportunity for items from recently killed elephants and rhinos to be sold through our markets. The demand (in any country) is driving the brutal killing spree. Alarmingly, there are no checks and balances in Australia’s unregulated trade to prevent items from recently killed elephants and rhinos being sold in our own backyard.

How we have tried to stop this brutal trade in Australia.

From left to right: Rebecca Keeble (IFAW), Dr Lynn Johnson (NatureNeedsMore), Fiona Gordon (Gordon Consulting), Minister Josh Frydenberg and Donalea Patman (For the Love of Wildlife).

In September 2016 we met with Energy and Environment Minister, Josh Frydenberg with a communique calling for a full domestic trade ban. The response from the government was that the trade in Australia isn’t contributing to the poaching crisis and our laws, regulations and processes are sufficient to ensure this isn’t the case. The communique was signed and supported by 56 Australian and international organisations. This warranted immediate action.

It wasn’t enough.

Part of the Federal Government’s response was that the issue of domestic trade and enforcement rests with State governments, not Federal. So we wrote to the Environment Ministers for each state to ask them. As we expected, the responses stated that the domestic trade is indeed a Federal Government responsibility. This also warranted immediate action.

It wasn’t enough.

We then called on members of the Australian public to write letters and upload images to social media to demonstrate their support for stopping this brutal trade and do our part in stopping the poaching crisis.

All of the people we spoke to were genuinely shocked that it’s still legal to buy and sell ivory and rhino horn in Australia, and believe that it should be banned. Hundreds of letters were sent to Minister Frydenberg’s office and hundreds of photos were uploaded to social media. This demonstrated strong support from the public for a domestic trade ban.

This wasn’t enough.

In August 2017 a workshop was held with key stakeholders working with a Federal MP to share our findings and the evidence we’d collected. Following the workshop we provided the Department of Environment and Energy with draft legislation for a domestic trade ban. We’ve heard nothing back from the government on this draft.

It wasn’t enough.

We rallied the public on World Wildlife Day – Saturday 3 March 2018 – and hosted Australia’s first ivory and rhino horn crush event in Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne. The event was attended by Federal MP Jason Wood to show the world that the only value ivory and rhino horn has is on a living animal. Hundreds of people came to show their support with people surrendering items they had bought, been gifted or inherited from family members, for crushing.

Australia’s first public crush of ivory and rhino horn on World Wildlife Day, 3 March 2018. Demonstrating that the only value is on a living animal. (Jason Wood MP in hat crushing ivory).

Internationally applauded designer Collette Dinnigan AO was event Ambassador and the call for a domestic trade ban gained overwhelming support from high profile individuals including Aussie rock legend John Farnham, actress Asher Keddie, Dr Jane Goodall and former NZ Prime Minister, Helen Clark.

The Melbourne Crush received attention from a variety of media including 7 News, The Age, ABC, National Geographic and international agencies.

This STILL wasn’t enough.

On 28 March 2018, the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Law Enforcement initiated an inquiry into the trade in elephant ivory and rhino horn.

We must make sure this is enough.

This is the last window to make sure the Australian Government hears your loud and clear call for a full domestic trade ban on ivory and rhino horn.

If you feel passionately about this, and we know you do, then we ask that you write and include your voice in the submission process. Take action and be part of doing something real to stop the brutal slaughter of elephants and rhinos through a submission for this inquiry. It’s time this ugly trade is #Gone4Good.

We MUST have an overwhelming response so that there’s NO question that Australia enacts a FULL DOMESTIC TRADE BAN.

What will it take?

You can lodge your submission here: https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Joint/Law_Enforcement/Elephantivoryrhinohorn

The Government has evidence to act. Whilst they go about “business as usual” we are watching elephants and rhinos disappear before our very eyes.

We also encourage you to call Prime Minister’s office on (02) 9327 3988 (International callers +61 2 9327 3988) and Minister for Energy and Environment, Josh Frydenberg at either his electoral office on (03) 9882 3677 (International +61 3 9882 3677) or Ministerial office (02) 6277 7920 (International +61 2 6277 7920) TODAY.

The Journey Home & Return To Earth

Melbourne Elephant Ivory and Rhino Horn Crush Epilogue

Donalea Patman, Founding Director, For the Love of Wildlife

 

For the Love of Wildlife has taken very seriously its commitment to the #MelbourneCrush and #NoDomesticTrade campaign. While the act of destroying elephant ivory and rhino horn items aims to show that the only value they have is on a living animal, importantly, we must consider that these items represent the death of thousands of elephants and rhinos.

#MelbourneCrush held in Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne on World Wildlife Day, 2018. Jason Wood MP destroying ivory surrendered by the Australian Government to be #Gone4Good.

Elephants are incredible creatures with strong social structures and personalities. Just like us, they have intricate family systems.  Rhinos are as ancient as time, yet there are just 27,000 rhinos left in the wild today. These sensitive beings are fast disappearing before our very eyes.

On Saturday 3 March 2018, Australia marked World Wildlife Day with a powerful message about the importance of these majestic animals, by destroying elephant ivory and rhino horn.

Understandably, we have being considering what the epilogue must be for the items being crushed.

A heart-felt invitation has been received from internationally celebrated artist and Founder of the Human Elephant Foundation, Andries Botha, for the crushed ivory and horn, of these elephants and rhinos, to take the journey home and be returned to the earth in the land that they were born. The crushed items will be buried beneath a bronze memorial Andries is creating to honour Dr Ian Player and his conservation partner, Magqubu Ntombela.

Dr Ian Player with his dear friend and conservation partner, Magqubu Ntombela.

Andries was a very dear and close friend of Dr Ian Player who passed in 2015. For the Love of Wildlife is both honoured and humbled by Andries’ invitation, for these elephants and rhinos to complete their journey home.

“It is, in my opinion vitally significant to bring the crushed rhino horn and elephant tusk home to the ancestral lands of these ancient creatures, where not only their bodies exist as essential components of our ecosystems, but where their ancestral presence and voices originate.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

I finish with a message from Andries.

We from the Human Elephant Foundation commend and support For the Love of Wildlife Ltd and the Australian supporters of the Melbourne Crush event.

It is critical that countries who are a part of the wildlife traffic economy take a courageous stand in support of wildlife that is now particularly vulnerable, as poachers, organised crime syndicates, corrupt governments and private and corporate business become more bold in their commodification of wild life products. It is imperative that we stand for these endangered animals. 

It is, in my opinion, vitally significant to bring the crushed rhino horn and elephant tusk home to the ancestral lands of these ancient creatures, where not only their bodies exist as essential components of our ecosystems, but where their ancestral presence and voices originate.

We are honoured to take custodianship of the crushed remains of these animals, to bury them beneath a monumental memorial sculpture soon to be erected to honour Magqubu Ntombela and Dr Ian Player, who saved the White Rhino from extinction in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and to repatriate them to the land they belong to.

A maquette of the memorial.

Andries Botha, South African Sculptor and Founder, Human Elephant Foundation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush, 1pm Bourke Street Mall, Melbourne 3 March

30% of Africa’s savanna elephants KILLED in 7 years. Rhinos left to DIE after having their faces cut off.

A perceived value in their tusks and horn for trinkets, carvings and status is driving this poaching crisis. Elephants and rhinos will be gone before we know it unless immediate GLOBAL ACTION is taken.

What can Australia and New Zealand do to protect these iconic species?

Enact a full domestic ban on the sale of ivory and rhino horn. Australia and New Zealand continue to allow an unregulated domestic trade, providing gaps for recently poached and trafficked items to be sold through our markets.

In September 2016 Donalea Patman OAM (For the Love of Wildlife), Dr Lynn Johnson (Natureneedsmore), Fiona Gordon (Gordon Consulting) and Rebecca Keeble (IFAW) met with Minister Josh Frydenberg to hand deliver IFAW’s “Under the Hammer” report exposing the rampant trade in Australia and NZ, and a communique signed by 56 Australian and International organisations calling for a full domestic trade ban – this alone should have warranted action.

Melbourne Crush ambassador, internationally acclaimed designer Collette Dinnigan AO, says; “As an Australian who was born in South Africa, I know that for Africa’s people to thrive its wildlife must also thrive.  Worldwide, any trade in elephant ivory or rhino horn that provides traffickers the opportunity to launder ivory and rhino horn from recently killed animals, must be decisively closed, this includes Australia and NZ. It is time to protect these magnificent animals, for our children.”

SURRENDER your ivory and rhino horn items to be DESTROYED to demonstrate that their only value is on a living animal. Drop items at reception, Melbourne Zoo beforehand if you can’t attend but wish to support this initiative, knowing too well that all ivory and rhino horn items are from the killing of a rhino or elephant, no matter its age.

Melbourne’s largest auction house Leonard Joel joins the call for a full domestic trade ban with latest Leonard Digital Newsletter promoting World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush.

If you wish to do something real for elephants and rhinos, please give generously – we can’t do this without you – Paypal or email info@fortheloveofwildlife.org.au

Stand up for elephants and rhinos by attending this historic Australian event. Send a loud and clear message that we want this trade #Gone4Good. For further event details click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working together towards the Melbourne Crush:

3 Degrees

Qantas

Save African Rhino Foundation

Born Free Foundation 

Zoos Victoria

Stephen Powell Photography/Wildlife Artist

Chris Gretch Design

Wisdom Graphics

Structured Events

 

We cannot stay silent whilst elephants and rhinos are brutally poached – their survival is in our hands.

An enormous thank you to internationally acclaimed designer Collette Dinnigan AO who knows just how important Africa’s wildlife is to its country, to its people. A true hero for wildlife, Colette’s commitment, hard work and passion has helped bring these extraordinary people together.

We cannot be silent and watch the brutal poaching crisis. Australia and New Zealand’s unregulated domestic trade allows for illegally trafficked items to be sold through our markets. Waiting for someone else to act isn’t a character trait of these extraordinary individuals.

All for the love of elephants and rhinos.

 

Workplace Giving

We have a very slim window to stop the irreversible decimation of wildlife, as we are in what scientists are calling the 6th Mass Extinction. Yet the ‘business as usual’ approach by large conservation and government agencies, we’ll lose some of the most iconic and beautiful wild ones; elephants, rhinos and lions, within the next ten years. We work from the top down, as it’s our endeavor to create global political will in doing more for the world’s wildlife. Our work with the Australian Government to be the first country to ban the importation of lion trophies and body parts, a courageous and visionary step by then Environment Minister Greg Hunt. A move that set precedent and was followed by other countries. We know our work isn’t sexy, but it’s creating a real difference for wildlife.

Donalea Patman OAM

 

Workplace Giving programs are an easy way for employees to make a big difference and contribute to something real for wildlife and wild places. It’s as simple as making small, regular donations directly from your pay, which can be managed by your payroll team, so you don’t even need to remember to do it. Donations are often matched by employers which means double the contribution.

Workplace Giving program is one of the most effective ways to boost morale in your workplace and demonstrate good corporate social responsibility. It helps build an organsation you can be proud to work for.

What’s more, these charitable donations are deducted before tax, so it provides an immediate tax benefit by reducing taxable income and there’s no need to keep receipts until tax time.

If you love wildlife then we encourage you to love our work as it’s all For the Love of Wildlife. We drive real change for the lives of endangered and threatened species.

We invite you to contact us for more information about Workplace Giving via info@fortheloveofwildlife.org.au or call (+61) 417 939 042.

By working together, we can turn the extinction crisis around and make the world a better place for wildlife.

How do I set up a Workplace Giving program at my work?

To set up a formal workplace giving program you should talk to the relevant person in your organisation (normally the head of human resources or sponsorship). This would involve the following steps:

  1. Identifying a group of staff members who are interested in wildlife and who wish to support For the Love of Wildlife.
  2. Each staff member who wishes to make a regular donation to us then needs to sign a letter authorising the payroll office to deduct a specified amount from each pay. We can provide a pro forma letter for this. The amount deducted will be sent by the payroll office directly to For the Love of Wildlife.
  3. We will liaise closely with your payroll office to assist in the establishment of the giving program.

Detailed information on workplace giving is also available on the Australian Taxation Office website.

Why workplace giving?

Regular donations are vital to fund our work protecting endangered wildlife and habitats, and meeting the urgent threats to our living planet. By donating through workplace (payroll) giving, you can make your money go even further.

BREAKING NEWS

Parliamentary Joint Committee into rhino horn and elephant ivory.

 

9 News 15 July, 2018

ELEPHANTS

Thousands of elephants and rhinos are poached around the world every year, but a loophole in Australian law allows ivory to be sold domestically.#9News | http://9News.com.au

Posted by 9 News Melbourne on Sunday, 15 July 2018

eBay joins calls for Australian ban on elephant ivory and rhinoceros horn sales

Tom McIlroy, Financial Review

July 4, 2018

 

 

 

ABC Radio 2 July 2018
By Political Reporter Melissa Clarke.

 

 

 

 

 

Fashion designer Collette Dinnigan calls for elephant tusk, rhino horn trade ban – May 2018

 

 

 


Australian ivory trade’s role in encouraging poaching to come under scrutiny – 5 April 2018
By political reporter Melissa Clarke

 

World Wildlife Day Melbourne Crush

 

National Geographic Australia – 2 March 2018

By Michael Smith

 

 

 

 

The Conversation – 12 March 2018

 

 

 

 

Sydney Morning Herald – 23 February 2018

By Amy Croffey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sydney Morning Herald – 3 March 2018

By Neelima Choahan & Shiamak Unwalla

 

 

 

 

ABC News – 4 March 2018

By  Tynan King

 

 

 

 

7 News Melbourne

By Melina Sarris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ranges Trade Mail – 6 March 2018

By Peter Douglas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buro 24/7 – 8 March 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Running Billboards

Captive Breeding and Canned Hunting

Bryan Seymour, 7 News covers the chilling footage brought to light by safari cameraman Derek Gobbett.

7 NEWS September 2016

Explosive footage and the truth exposed by Derek Gobbett, a safari cameraman accompanying 10 hunters on De Klerk Safaris concession hosted by Stormberg Elangeni Safaris. This is the full story which was featured in the recent BBC story.

A Parliamentary Inquiry into the register of Environmental Organisations who focus work on issues outside of Australia, wanting their deductible gift recipient status removed. This article by Roderick Campbell lays it bare.

https://newmatilda.com/2016/05/19/breaking-down-party-lions/

The Federal Election in Australia had us featured as part of Jason Wood’s election campaign. Jason Wood held his seat in the electorate of La Trobe with support of the Animal Justice Party.

Election Press 28:06:16 Full pageElection Press 28:06:16 Story

Media on CACH’s withdrawal from I’m a Celebrity, Network Ten, Australian Reality TV

Bryan Seymour, 7 News 14 March 2016

Lucy Mae Beers, Daily Mail Australia 16 March 2016

Ebony Bowden, Sydney Morning Herald, 16 March 2016

Courier Mail, 16 March 2016

Scoopla, 16 March 2016

 

The Animals Post 2015 UK, 2015

International Business Times – 31 March, 2015

Mojo (Monash Journalism) 16 March, 2015

sponsors13

 

By Isabel McCrea, IFAW Australia published 13 March, 2015.

IFAW Article

 

Daily Maverick

By Peter Borchert, South Africa 15 March 2015

Peter Borchert

sponsors-fourpaws

 

By FOUR PAWS International

FOUR PAWS

 

The Guardian

By Oliver Milman, 13 March 2015

Nova Magazine March Edition by Jeremy Ball

 

Article Mail Newspaper, 4 March, 2015

Mail 4 March 2015

Article Herald Sun, Victoria, 3 March, 2015

Herald Sun 3 March 2015

Article Saturday Star, Johannesburg, December 6, 2014

Joburg Sat Star Dec 6

Joburg Sat Star Full Page

 

Article The Mail, March 4, 2014

The Mail 8 July 2014 -2

The Mail 8 July 2014 -1

Ecolarge-2013-200m-question

Leader Community Newspaper, July 4, 2014

Simon Bloch, Durban reports on Australian Government’s initiative (Sunday 6 July, Weekend Argus)

S Bloch, Sth Africa

Article The Mail, March 4, 2014

Newspaper article 3 March

Jason Wood MP tables Private Member’s Motion to close the Australian domestic trade in ivory and rhino horn.

Monday 23 October Jason Wood MP tabled a Private Member’s Motion to the House of Representatives in Canberra.

Jason championed the ban on lion trophies and body parts which was announced by then Environment Minister Greg Hunt in March 2015, before the death of Cecil, the famous lion killed by US dentist Walter Palmer.

The collaboration of For the Love of Wildlife with Fiona Gordon of Gordon Consulting NZ and Nature Needs More (previously Breaking the Brand) has exposed the serious flaws not only in the CITES reporting, but also Australia’s failure to prosecute with hundreds of confiscations and seizures over a period 2010 – 2016.

There’s a global call to close ALL markets and we’re very excited that Jason Wood is again stepping up for Africa’s iconic species.

Hansard from Monday’s Motion.

Australia…No Domestic Trade!

Despite what many Australians might believe, elephant ivory and rhino horn is sold in Australia.

International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) released their “Under the Hammer” report, exposing how much ivory and rhino horn is being sold through auction rooms.

The report identified that only 2.7 per cent of items inspected at Australian auction rooms had ‘provenance’ documentation which provides the most useful information to determine the origin and legality of an item.

Items for sale in Chapel Street, Melbourne.

At least three rhinos are brutally slaughtered daily and one elephant is killed every 15 minutes. The South African government released rhino poaching statistics for 2016, reporting 1,054 rhinos has been killed.

A privately funded Great Elephant Census states that African elephant populations have declined by 30 per cent over the last seven years.

The Chinese Government announced it will close its ivory market by the end of 2017 and it’s time Australia does too.

Print out the Speak Out Letter and post to the Minister. Details are on the letter and you don’t have to be living in Australia.

In September 2016 the Australian Government was asked to enact a total ban on the domestic trade of elephant ivory and rhino horn in a communiqué that was hand delivered to Minister for the Environment and Energy, Josh Frydenberg.

Signed by over 50 conservation organisations from around the world, the ban would be a move to ensure Australia commits to playing its role in saving elephants and rhinos from extinction in the wild in the near future.

The communique was presented by Australian NGO founders Donalea Patman (For the Love of Wildlife) and Dr Lynn Johnson (Breaking The Brand) together with Fiona Gordon of New Zealand based environmental firm Gordon Consulting and Rebecca Keeble of IFAW.

Ms Patman has been disappointed with the response from Minister Frydenberg and the apparent confusion about who is responsible for dealing with illegal ivory or rhino horn.

“The response was that Australia is unlikely to be driving the elephant poaching or international illegal trade,” Ms Patman said.

“On top of that, ivory was found for sale in Western Australia in December 2016 which didn’t have the required documentation (shocking to see that ivory appears in their catalogue again in February).

It was first reported to the Australian Federal Police who then referred it to State Police, who then passed it to Border Control,” she said.

“There is clearly confusion about who is responsible and a lack of political will to demonstrate leadership on this issue,” she said.

Items for auction in Mt Lawley in December 2016.

The threat of extinction of these iconic species remains high. In November last year Vietnam hosted the third International Wildlife Trade Conference in Hanoi.

The Duke of Cambridge and President of United for Wildlife, Prince William attended the conference and delivered a speech on tackling illegal wildlife trade. In his speech he stated “A betting man would still bet on extinction”.

Follow the campaign on Facebook and use the following hashtags #NoDomesticTrade #EyesOnIvory #RhinosMatter #NotOnMyWatch

Print out these posters, take a selfie with it and post to our Facebook page…show Australia that it’s time. The Australian Government needs the public to show that it cares deeply about saving these iconic African animals.

Print out the Speak Out Letter and post to the Minister. Details are on the letter and you don’t have to be living in Australia.

 

The communique that was hand delivered to the Minister in September 2016. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional press:

Financial Review, May 2018

SA Breaking News 13 Nov 2017

Lowvelder Press 13 November 2017

SA Breaking News

15 Minute News

Traveller 24

Netwerk 24

The Mercury